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Lighting technology to help realise aspirations for stadiums

Latest lighting technology would help realise aspirations for New Zealand stadiums

Wellington, August 14, 2014 – New Zealand stadiums have the opportunity to become world leaders in pitch lighting, with Philips’ release in New Zealand of LED floodlights as part of its ArenaVision range.

“Sports lighting technology has developed considerably in recent years, with LED floodlights now able to provide the high lumen output required for high-definition broadcasting standards, while also providing control and flexibility to manage light spillage onto neighbouring roads and properties,” says Gordon Wiffen, General Manager of Philips Lighting New Zealand.

The new ArenaVision LED range provides high quality light output and greater control capabilities than standard metal halide floodlights. ArenaVision LED floodlights also use up to 34.7% less energy than ArenaVision metal halide floodlights, while the inherently longer lifetime of LED reduces maintenance with longer periods between lamp changes. Typically, metal halide floodlighting lamps should be replaced every three-seasons to maintain the lighting levels required, whereas the Philips LED system is expected to last in excess of 10 seasons.

ArenaVision LED technology allows a quick re-start compared to the warm-up time of Philips metal halide floodlights, making it faster to continue events in an unforeseen power outage, or switch between optimal lighting configurations for specific sports.

The ArenaVision LED control system can also be used to create entertainment lighting effects that would normally require dedicated stage-lighting luminaires. At the push of a button, the user can switch between fixed lighting configurations that fulfil sports codes’ requirements, and pre-programed special lighting effects.

“Lighting is critical for sports venues, not only to give the high definition needed for both players and broadcasters, but also to enhance the sense of spectacle, anticipation and emotion that comes with competitive sports, including giving stadiums that extra ‘wow-factor’ through colourful light displays,” says Mr Wiffen.

Philips has already lit up a number of New Zealand sporting venues such as Eden Park, Nelson’s Trafalgar Park and Dunedin’s indoor Forsyth Barr Stadium with its high intensity discharge ArenaVision range. Philips ArenaVision has also lit up major stadiums around the world, such as Old Trafford Stadium, the Guangzhou Olympic Stadium and five of the football stadiums recently used in Brazil.

“With Philips’ ArenaVision LED now successfully implemented in sports stadiums such as Ekinox at Bourg-en-Bresse, France and Chelsea Football Club’s Stamford Bridge, there is an opportunity for New Zealand stadiums to take advantage of the latest developments in lighting technology, which would benefit broadcasters, players, bill payers and spectators alike,” says Mr Wiffen.

About Royal Philips
Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) is a diversified health and well-being company, focused on improving people’s lives through meaningful innovation in the areas of Healthcare, Consumer Lifestyle and Lighting. Headquartered in the Netherlands, Philips posted 2013 sales of EUR 23.3 billion and employs approximately 113,000 employees with sales and services in more than 100 countries. The company is a leader in cardiac care, acute care and home healthcare, energy efficient lighting solutions and new lighting applications, as well as male shaving and grooming and oral healthcare. News from Philips is located at www.philips.com/newscenter.

ENDS

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