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Meadow Mushrooms Opens Second Stage Of $120m Redevelopment

August 15, 2014

Meadow Mushrooms Opens Second Stage Of $120 Million Redevelopment

The second stage of a $120 million redevelopment and expansion project at one of New Zealand’s largest agricultural enterprises will be opened this week.

The $12 million investment into the extension of Meadow Mushrooms’ Christchurch farm will add a further 60 jobs and increase production by 37,000 kilograms of fresh white mushrooms a week.

This project follows the $45 million expansion undertaken by the company on site in 2011 and is the second of three stages to completely reconfigure the company’s infrastructure in New Zealand. A new office administration and headquarters construction project will commence before the end of the year and will be followed by an expansion of the compost facilities and growing shed conversions.

“This development demonstrates Meadow Mushrooms’ confidence in the future market and our commitment to the industry,” said John Barnes, CEO of Meadow Mushrooms.

“It’s also an important milestone in the regional economy, under-pinning Canterbury’s reputation as a world-renowned food-growing region.

“The 25% increase in output will ensure that we can continue to meet New Zealand’s growing demand for mushrooms and ongoing export potential.

“The certainty of increased supply will allow us to guarantee supply and improve service to our customers, both domestically and internationally,” he said.

Meadow Mushrooms currently employ 480 staff and produces on average 150,000 kilograms of freshly hand-picked mushrooms every week in its sophisticated, state-of-the-art growing facilities.

The company is confident that the annual growth of sales that has been a consistent achievement since the launch of Meadow Mushrooms in New Zealand in the early 1970s will continue into the future.

“New Zealanders currently consume an average of 2kg of mushrooms per person, each year, which is approximately 30% below the Australian consumption average,” said John Barnes.

“New Zealand consumers recognise the nutritional value of mushrooms, their versatility and their importance to a wide range of menu options so we are confident of continuing growth of demand,” he said.

Fresh mushrooms are the 3rd highest selling vegetable in New Zealand, exceeded only by potatoes and tomatoes.

ENDS

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