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Around 20 million photos are lost in New Zealand every year

21 August 2014

For Immediate Release

Around 20 million photos are lost in New Zealand every year

The unexpected, devastating consequences of mobile phone loss and theft

AUCKLAND; NZ – A survey conducted in 2012 found that 41 percent of Kiwi adults have lost a mobile device or had it stolen.* On losing a cellular device, people claim their biggest concerns were whether a stranger would access their contacts, rack up a large bill, or take and use one’s personal details.

There is one potentially heartbreaking consequence that New Zealanders are overlooking: the disappearance of irreplaceable photos.

While New Zealanders love taking photos on their smartphones, they very rarely think to store them securely or print them out.

FUJIFILM, New Zealand’s leading imaging company, is on a mission to raise awareness of the issue in this country.

Peter Bonisch, Sales and Marketing Manager of FUJIFILM, says that New Zealanders take around 1.2 billion snaps on their smartphones every year.

“On average, we each store around 1,200 photos on our phone,” says Bonisch.

“International trends indicate that smartphones will soon become our primary image storing device, ahead of computers, tablets and digital cameras, yet fewer than 10 percent of those photos are ever printed.”

“We scroll through and reminisce, and share a few photos on social media, but most of them stay on our phone,” says Bonisch.

“So if that disappears, so do our photos.

People are losing precious reminders of significant events, their friends and their family history.”

FUJIFILM estimates that in New Zealand each year, approximately 20 million photos are lost forever.

Bonisch also points out that Snapchat is now the world’s largest photo sharing app – however it does not store images.

"Entire generations of memories are being lost.”

FUJIFILM offers five simple precautions to consumers to keep their mobile phones safe, and protect and preserve their photos.

-- Regularly upload your photos to the Cloud.

-- Save photos from your phone to your computer so there exists a second copy.

-- Print your photos quickly and easily at a FUJIFILM photo kiosk.

Simply download the innovative (and free for iPhones and Androids) FUJIFILM TransPix mobile app, connect wirelessly, select your photos and print.

As well as classic photos, favourite images can be used to create anything from wall art to a unique storybook.

-- Print out your smartphone photos at home, with the new FUJIFILM Instax SHARE.

Wireless printing turns your snaps into retro analogue--style Instax photos.

-- Keep your phone safe at all times FUJIFILM photo kiosks are available at more than 150 stores around New Zealand, including Harvey Norman, Warehouse Stationery, Fujifilm Image Service, and selected Smiths City, Noel Leeming, pharmacy and photographic stores.

The FUJIFILM Instax SHARE is available from JBHiFi, Noel Leeming, Harvey Norman, FUJIFILM Image Service and photo specialty stores, RRP $249.99.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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