Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


NZ consumer confidence sinks to 10-month low

NZ consumer confidence sinks to 10-month low amid signs growth has peaked

By Jonathan Underhill

Aug. 21 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand consumer confidence fell to a 10-month low in August, suggesting rising interest rates, weaker commodity prices and waning house price inflation are denting sentiment in an economy that may be growing at a slower pace.

The ANZ-Roy Morgan Consumer Confidence Index fell 7 points to 125.5, snapping two months of gains. The current conditions index eased to 123.4 from 126.3 and the future conditions index dropped to 126.9 from 137.

Confidence dipped across all indicators in the survey. Those saying they were better off financially than a year ago fell to a net 7 percent from 9 percent, while those expecting to be better off in a year's time fell to 35 percent from 40 percent. The survey comes after the Treasury this week shaved its forecasts for economic growth, while still seeing enough tax revenue to return to surplus next year.

"The economy may be moderating from a gallop to a canter but we're still growing solidly," said Cameron Bagrie, chief economist at ANZ New Zealand Bank. "Various leading indicators of momentum - the tightening in financial conditions and lower commodity prices - foretell a deceleration in growth. Conversely, lagging indicators such as employment growth remain more robust."

The August survey shows those expecting New Zealand as a whole will enjoy good economic times in the year ahead fell to a net 20 percent from 34 percent, while looking five years out, it fell to a net 26 percent from 38 percent.

Asked whether it was a good time to buy a major household items, a net 40 percent said yes, down from 44 percent a month ago. Those expecting prices in general to rise in the next two years fell to a net 3.3 percent from 3.9 percent. Those seeing a rise in house prices in that period slipped to a net 3.6 percent from 4.1 percent.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Statistics: Dairy And Travel Still Our Largest Export Earners

New Zealand earned $2.3 billion more from exports than we spent on imports during the year ended June 2015... total exports of goods and services were $67.5 billion, while total imports were $65.1 billion. More>>

ALSO:

Approval: Air New Zealand And Air China Launch New Alliance Route

Air New Zealand and Air China have today launched joint sales for a new daily direct service between Auckland and Beijing after receiving approval from New Zealand Minister of Transport Hon Simon Bridges to form a strategic alliance. More>>

ALSO:

Money Trading: FX Trader Jin Yuan Finance Warned Over Lack Of Monitoring

Jin Yuan Finance, an Auckland-based foreign exchange trader, has been warned over its lack of anti-money laundering processes in place in the first public notification by the Department of Internal Affairs. More>>

ALSO:

Auckland Surge, Possible Peak: House Values Accelerate At Fastest Annual Pace In 8 Years

New Zealand residential property values rose at their fastest annual pace in eight years in August, pushed higher by overflowing demand in Auckland, which is showing signs speculators think it has reached its peak, according to Quotable Value. More>>

ALSO:

Cash Money: Reserve Bank Launches New $5 And $10 Banknotes

The $5 and $10 final banknotes were revealed at an event at the Bank in Wellington, and will start to be released from mid-October 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Truck Sales Booted: Commerce Commission Files Charges Against Mobile Trader

The Commerce Commission has filed charges against a mobile trader, or truck shop operator, claiming he obtained money from customers by deception and never intended to supply them with the goods they paid for. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news