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Shortage of skilled hospitality workers, exporting talent

Press Release

26th August 2014

A growing shortage of skilled hospitality workers sees exporting talent a good option

A successful New Zealand Hospitality Company is playing its part in the current skills shortage affecting the hospitality industry.

Martarni is doing its bit in adding to the quality talent pool in New Zealand and are helping kiwis in the hospitality sector looking for career paths overseas.

Martarni Director Andrew Rhoades says sometimes the best career path is to look offshore, a lot of the best chefs in New Zealand have had vital experience overseas, which has added to our growing culinary reputation in this country.

“They have been working with different produce, learning new skills, different techniques and in most cases had life experiences during their OE that has added to their individual skill set,” said Andrew.

“Kiwi Chefs have a great reputation throughout the world; they are hardworking, sponge like and with a good basic knowledge of the culinary art. They have worked for world renowned hotel groups, famous and celebrity Chefs and some that are so old school they will never even utter your Christian name.”

“Remembering there are only so many great kitchens in New Zealand so if chefs want to further their careers heading offshore is a great option.”

“I can easily compare it to any New Zealand sports person who head overseas to further their careers, to compete against the best week in week out, it only enhances their skill set, they are still Kiwis and they do return better for it and thus our industry is stronger for it.”

“Is there a skills shortage in Hospitality in New Zealand, damn right there is, but there is throughout the world. Australia is no different with statistics showing that by 2016 Australia will have a skilled shortage in Hospitality by over 50,000!”

“So the answer for many chefs may be to start your international hospitality education across the ditch where a work visa is not required for a New Zealand citizen”, said Andrew.

“Although there are a number of International Recruitment Companies out there but we are in the perfect position because we can eat at the Restaurants where these chefs are plying their trade and don’t rely on a Trip Advisor comments to check their suitability, and that’s one reason why our clients keep coming back to us.”

Martarni has placed Kiwis all over Australia, the South Pacific, Asia, the Maldives and through to Dubai from CDP’s through to GM’s so exporting is not new to them and their clients keep coming back which is great because they are only as good as their last placement!

Martarni doesn’t see ‘exporting talent’ as a negative, as that talent only comes back all the better for it, if it works for the All Blacks it works for hospitality as well.

Ends

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