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Te Horo Wins: 2014 MiNDFOOD Wellington on a Plate Award

Te Horo Foods

MEDIA STATEMENT

27 August 2014

Popular Kapiti Coast food business wins Best Established Producer in the 2014 MiNDFOOD Wellington on a Plate Producer Awards

Kapiti Coast based Te Horo foods, the makers of Te Horo Brand Jams and Marmalades, has won the established producer category of the 2014 MiNDFOOD Wellington on a Plate Producer Awards.

Te Horo foods founder, Tim Gibbs said “this is a wonderful achievement for our little Kapiti Coast Company. We are a small family business and to be named as the Established Producer of the year really shows that the work we are doing to ensure that Te Horo Brand are the most recognised premium Jams and Marmalades in New Zealand is paying off”

This year’s winners of the MiNDFOOD Producer Awards are a smorgasbord of tasty artisanal treats crowned by Supreme Winner, Kingsmeade Cheese.

Part of the Visa Wellington On a Plate food festival, the MiNDFOOD Producer Awards recognise the best of the Wellington region’s producers.

Winners for 2014 include Wairarapa cheesemakers, Kingsmeade Cheese (Producer of the Year and Best Sustainable Producer) winemakers, Matahiwi Estate (Runner up Producer of the Year) jam experts, Te Horo Foods (Best Established Producer), and tied for Best New Producer, charcuterie champions, Big Bad Wolf and specialist baker, Clareville Bakery.

Head Judge and MiNDFOOD editor-in-chief Michael McHugh said this year’s judging was made more challenging due to an increase in the number of high quality entries.

“We had more than 100 entries this year from producers across the Wellington region ranging from established businesses with strong exports to start-ups with only local distribution.

“The quality of the products these businesses are producing are world class. Wellington has become a real hub of artisanal producers with booming boutique beverage and specialty food sectors”.

Te Horo foods has a great history of producing award-winning jam

Founded in 2010, Te Horo foods has won a number of awards

In 2010, Te Horo foods won the Regional Branding and Promotion category award in the Kapiti Horowhenua Business Awards. In the same year Te Horo Foods was presented the New Zealand Foods Awards Grocer's Choice Award and in 2012, Te Horo foods’ popular Raspberry Jam won the Cuisine Artisan award.

ENDS.

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