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Airways provides Pacific aviation solutions

Airways provides Pacific aviation solutions

29 August 2014


At the upcoming International Conference on Small Island Developing States, Airways New Zealand will present to delegates about the safe, successful and sustainable aviation model it has in the Pacific.

Pauline Lamb, Chief Operating Officer, will represent Airways at the conference, to be held in Apia, Samoa from 1 to 4 September. Airways’ main focus will be the Private Sector Partnerships Forum on 30 and 31 August.

“We see this forum as a good opportunity to foster practical relationships in support of safe and sustainable aviation, particularly as over recent years we’ve accumulated significant experience in this arena,” she says.

Ms Lamb says Airways is very aware of the challenges faced by Pacific Island countries. “We are furthering our support for the islands with a vision to enhance aviation safety and help facilitate long-term sustainable and efficient aviation services. This includes the creation of a seamless air navigation region, with a consistent level of reliable infrastructure,” she says.

“Our focus within Airways is to develop strategies and services which make a real difference, such as satellite-based communication for the aviation community, surveillance, mapping, lighting and navigational infrastructure – all of which we hope will enhance transport connectivity and facilitate growth of the local economies. For instance, this month we’re working in Vanuatu to develop satellite-based approaches at the remote Lonorore Airport, on Pentecost Island, where growing tourism demands regular flights, regardless of inclement weather,” says Ms Lamb.

Airways has strong relationships with many Pacific Island countries and provides air traffic management services including technical maintenance, flight inspection, Pacific AIP management, navigation, communications, charting and procedure design, other consulting services and training, as well as upper airspace management, and PASNet – a satellite-based communication network.

“Airways cares very much about delivering safe, value-for-money services, which use a bit of kiwi ingenuity to provide well thought-out solutions,” Ms Lamb says.

“We have a fabulous set of people who would like to see the economies of our Pacific Island neighbours grow, and safe air connectivity be a large part of a thriving region. I look forward to the SIDS conference and getting to know how we can help most,” she concludes.

- Ends -

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