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Fonterra China Deal Demands Safe Supply Chain

Fonterra China Deal Demands Safe Supply Chain

The future success of Fonterra’s deal to sell infant formula in China [1] requires all milk it uses be safe and for Fonterra to secure its supply chain from contamination by GE DNA and pesticide residues. There is now significant risk from importations of dried distillers grain (DDG) and soy containing unapproved GE lines, destined for use as animal feed.

This Fonterra partnership with China announced today comes just as news of a shipment into New Zealand of 10000’s of tonnes of both GE soy and GE maize, to be used as feed for calves and as supplementary feed for cows. China has refused to import DDG due to its unapproved safety status. Yet New Zealand has jumped at the opportunity to import these cheap untested GE products, in a move that undermines the integrity of the supply chain.

Authorities acknowledge that GE DNA can cross the gut barrier and has been found in the meat, milk and embryos of animals and humans. There is also clear evidence of increasing levels of pesticide use on GE crops and resulting increased residues.

“New Zealand is trading as a GE Free agricultural economy and any GE DNA in the milk will further undermine our reputation for infant formula safety," said Claire Bleakley, president of GE Free NZ.

“Dairy farmers are at the front end of our economy and using GE feed could end in catastrophe. Fonterra is still reeling from the botulism care. They cannot allow international consumer confidence to be undermined by GE and pesticide residues."

In the America’s they have recorded an increase of toxic agrochemicals of 858%. There are three main herbicides used, glufosinate, glyphosate and 2,4-D.

Increases in reproductive disorders, spontaneous abortions, children born with congenital abnormalities like Spina Bifida and Downs Syndrome have reached epidemic levels where GE products have been eaten and grown. [2]

Fonterra should reverse its decision two years ago that removed the premium paid for organic milk, which does not allow use of these synthetic pesticides and GE organisms.

“Fonterra must renegotiate their contracts with farmers to encourage milk production that is free from such pesticides and GE," said Claire Bleakley.

“Infants are the most vulnerable to toxic effects of pesticides and GE foods. When going offshore to supply China’s infant milk Fonterra must ensure that their supply chain is safe, pure and free of any toxicity."

It is vital Fonterra products maintain the gold standard for safety, quality and purity. If the GE DDG and GE soy is fed to dairy cows it will undermine consumer confidence and make promises or guarantees of safety meaningless.

ENDS

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