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Odds decrease for thieves

Odds decrease for thieves

ServiceIQ’s introductory theft prevention course gives retailers another weapon in the war on theft.

Introduction to Preventing Theft and Fraud is available online and teaches staff the fundamentals in identifying and preventing theft from shops and other small businesses. It covers both theft and fraud, and looks at the risks from customers, staff and suppliers.

“Theft from shops reportedly costs New Zealand $760 million per year. The real total is likely to be much higher as many thefts go unnoticed or unreported”, says ServiceIQ Chief Executive Dean Minchington. “Retail crime surveys in New Zealand and overseas show that shop theft is increasing. The risk to businesses is very real and reducing the cost of theft can benefit the business and its customers.”

The course is part of the ServiceIQ Skills Online suite of online training. Courses include customer service skills, consumer legislation, and resolving customer complaints. They can be completed by anyone, and at any time and any place, online or on a mobile device, and can be finished in a lunch break.

Everyone who completes the course will be armed with practical tools to take action against fraudsters and thieves. They get detailed and practical advice on preventing potential crime, identifying it, and taking action when it is detected. People completing the course can print a certificate recording their success.

Introduction to Preventing Theft and Fraud costs just $25. To access Introduction to Preventing Theft and Fraud, go to www.serviceiqskillsonline.org.nz and help stop theft today.

ENDS

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