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New Ballance director brings new dimension

3 September 2014

New Ballance director brings new dimension

Ballance Agri-Nutrients has appointed Genesis Energy Chief Executive Albert Brantley as a new independent director to its board.

The farm nutrient co-operative reconfigured its board in 2012 to include three appointed directors to work alongside six regional directors elected by its farmer shareholders.

Ballance Chairman David Peacocke says independent directors are crucial to the governance of the co-operative with its turnover of close to $1 billion and profits of $90 million.

“We have come a long way from being a simple fertiliser company. We have divisions including complex fertiliser and feed manufacturing, we are developing leading edge farm technology and we are an integral part of the agricultural sector which drives our economy. A combination of farmer directors and appointed directors ensure we have the balance of skills, experience and perspectives for good governance. We take our commitment to performing consistently for our farmer shareholders seriously, and having strong governance is an essential component of this.”

“Albert brings to the table 20 years of experience operating at an executive level leading operationally complex businesses which require high levels of stakeholder, political, regulatory and environmental management.

“I am certain the board will stand to gain much from his capability, maturity, and breadth of international experience including executive roles in listed companies.”

A highly qualified engineer, Mr Brantley has worked on a number of engineering and commercial projects in the oil and gas, mining and power generation sectors across the globe. In New Zealand he was chief executive of L&M Mining from 1987 to 1991 and chief operating officer at OceanaGold before his Genesis appointment.

Mr Brantley replaces incumbent director David Pilkington, who is retiring at the end of his current term this month after 10 ½ years on the Ballance board.

“David has contributed a vast amount of knowledge to the Board over the past decade and has helped guide us through an enormous period of growth. We wish him all the very best.”

Mr Brantley will join the Ballance board of directors for its September board meeting and annual meeting of shareholders.


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