Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Croxley confirms it will cease manufacturing

Croxley confirms it will cease manufacturing

Croxley Stationery today confirmed that it will cease manufacturing over the next nine months and build its future as a dedicated wholesaler.

The iconic New Zealand stationery and office products supplier announced a fortnight ago that it was consulting staff on a proposal to cease manufacturing owing to a range of external factors.

Managing Director David Lilburne today paid tribute to staff who will be affected by the change, which will see close to 100 people made redundant between now and the middle of next year.

“Today more than anything our hearts go out to the affected staff and their families. These are people who have been part of the Croxley family for a long time and I am truly sorry that it has come to this.”

He says the manufacturing team have done an outstanding job and could not possibly have done anything to change the situation.

“We are working individually with our people to support them as much as we can through the transition process. We have a long history of looking after our staff and we will continue to do the right thing by them and their families.”

Mr Lilburne says key factors contributing to the decision include a decline in postal use and demand for traditional paper-based products with emails replacing envelopes and writing paper; the widespread availability of cheap imported products; the strength of the New Zealand dollar which impacts on Croxley’s ability to successfully export products manufactured locally; and the fact that investing in new manufacturing machinery in a declining market simply doesn’t stack up.

Croxley’s envelope production is likely to wrap up between now and the end of the year with other areas of manufacturing to follow in the first half of 2015.

Croxley has almost a century of history behind it and is currently the country’s largest stationery wholesaler, supplying a broad range of products to the office and education sector.

Mr Lilburne says as the company moves to becoming a dedicated wholesaler it will look to broaden and update its product range to meet the changing needs of the market.
“We will continue to work with our valued customers to ensure supply continuity for the products they source from Croxley.”

“While today is a sad day, this decision is certainly not the end for Croxley. It is a new beginning.”

- Ends –

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: