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Public conversations putting company data in peril

MEDIA RELEASE

Risky business: Public conversations putting company data in peril

Research shows the top locations for putting privacy at risk

New Zealand, 26 September 2014 – According to new research released today by global workplace provider Regus, New Zealand workers are putting business privacy at risk when working outside of the office, with cafés topping the list of unsafe locations for business privacy.

The Regus survey which canvased over 22,000 respondents in more than 100 countries found that although cafés are a popular time-out point for kiwis to catch up on tasks while on-the-go, 70% of businesses reported this is where the privacy of documents and conversations are most at danger.

Airport business lounges (62%) as well as hotel bars and lounges (40%) were other locations respondents reported company data is put at serious risk.

However, cafés and lounges are not the only place where private business information can fall into the wrong hands. Nearly two thirds of respondents cited working with documents or laptops on board flights (61%) and on trains (22%) were also dangerous for maintaining information security.

Top risk spots for business privacyNew Zealand
1. Cafés70%
2. Airline business lounges62%
3. On board flights61%
4. Hotel bars and lounges40%
5. On board trains22%

The most common activity respondents believe are putting company data and information at risk is conversations on mobile phones - with 76% of respondents believing this most likely to expose confidential business information to potential competitors. Snoopers reading printed documents over peoples shoulders (61%), and open laptop screens (57%), were also reported to be activities that were most likely to expose private company information.

Commenting on the study, Country Manager for Regus New Zealand, Nick Bradshaw, said: “People are spending more time travelling to and from work, and often spending the day between meetings and conferences. With the introduction of flexible working models designed to encourage more agile business environments and mobile technology, workers work in many locations and environments.

"However, workers should be aware of their location when taking a sensitive client call or checking important emails or documents commuting and in between meetings – you just never know who’s listening.

“To prevent risking company data, companies that offer employees a range of physical and technological resources is the best way to protect information. At Regus, we are seeing an increasing number of businesses utilise our drop-in meeting services and private spaces, which range from virtual desktops to private meeting rooms and lounges – we even provide free tea and coffee.”

-Ends-


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