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Half year performance better than expected for farmer co-op

Media information

For immediate release

12 February 2015

Half year performance better than expected for farmer co-op

LIC has recorded a solid performance in the first half of the financial year.

In the six months to 30 November 2014, the co-op achieved revenue of $159 million, 17.7% higher than the same period last year.

Chairman Murray King said the half year result was better than expected, and driven by farmers choosing to continue to invest in solutions which improve their productivity and prosperity.

“As their co-operative, we provide farmers with solutions that will add value on-farm and deliver a return on their investment.

“While we do see a reduced spend in lower payout years, we find that farmers are willing to continue to invest in the solutions that will deliver a high return for their business.”

King says the co-op experienced particularly high demand for its short gestation genetics. DNA parentage testing and information and automation technology systems also remain popular.

A lower year on year net profit after tax result is forecast, as part of the expected impact of milk payout and the co-op’s ongoing investment into technology and infrastructure worth more than $20 million.

The co-op has reviewed where it can reduce discretionary costs without impacting service to farmers, King said.

As part of its growth strategy, the co-op has announced a number of new developments this financial year, including a joint venture in Brazil, partnerships with Figured and SCR, and the merger of subsidiary business DAL and Protrack.

Summary, Half Year Result

LIC revenue and other income for the six months to 30 November 2014 was $159 million, 17.7% ahead of the $135.2 million achieved during the same period in 2013. Net profit after tax for the half year was $29.7 million, up $2.7 million from the previous year reflecting the strong first half revenues across most product categories.

LIC’s business, particularly artificial breeding (AB), is highly seasonal. Half year results incorporate the majority of AB revenues but not a similar proportion of total costs, and are therefore not indicative of the second half, nor the full year, result. No dividend is therefore declared at half year.

LIC continues to operate a strong balance sheet with total assets including cash, software, land and buildings and bull teams of $322.6 million. Cash flows from operations continued to strengthen generating $6.6 million, compared to $1.2 million in the half year to 30 November 2013.

ENDS


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