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Submissions on herbicide with two new active ingredients

Media release


8 June 2015

Submissions sought on herbicide with two new active ingredients

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) is calling for submissions on an application for release of the herbicide GF-2687. This herbicide contains two active ingredients that are new to New Zealand, halauxifen methyl and florasulam. It is intended to be used for the control of broadleaf weeds in cereal crops, including wheat and barley.

The application from Dow AgroSciences (NZ) Ltd is for a granule herbicide containing two ingredients that have not previously been approved under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act and which are not components in any approved formulations.

It will come in the form of a wettable granule herbicide that is dissolved in water and sprayed using ground-based and aerial application methods. It is expected to be applied up to two times per crop cycle.

View application details and information

The public are invited to make submissions on the application to the EPA. The submission period for this application opens on 8 June 2015 and close at 5pm on 20 July 2015.

Submissions are an opportunity to provide further information and raise issues about an application. They will inform a decision-making committee that will decide whether to approve the application.

A public hearing may be held before a decision is made. The EPA will provide at least 10 working days’ notice of the hearing date, time and place. We'll provide this information to all submitters and the applicant.


Find more information on submissions and the hearing process

The EPA’s role is to decide on applications under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act to import and manufacture hazardous substances. We put controls in place to manage the risks of hazardous substances to safeguard people and the environment.

ENDS


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