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Auror secures round of funding

Auror secures round of funding

Plans expansion into global markets

Crime prevention software developer Auror (formerly Eyedentify) has completed a round of funding to support further development and expansion of its class-leading software.

Auror, whose New Zealand customers already include supermarkets, petrol stations, sports and homeware stores, secured the funding from a range of heavyweight tech investors including Sam Morgan, K1W1 (Sir Stephen Tindall’s investment fund) and Australian investor Reinventure.

Auror CEO, Phil Thomson, says the investment will allow Auror to further refine its solution and set up its Australian operations, taking its products to the global stage. Co-founder Tom Batterbury says the company, which was previously called Eyedentify, has changed its name to Auror as it “better reflects our mission of connecting the dots to shed light on crime.”

Investor Sam Morgan says Auror has huge potential to solve a big, global problem.

“The problem of high-volume crimes like shoplifting and petrol drive-offs is universal. It’s not a question of opportunistic theft, it’s a coordinated effort by crime groups who regularly work together to target New Zealand businesses. Business and Police have to adapt to better prevent this sort of crime. I believe Auror is a key enabler to underpin a preventative approach to this kind of theft,” says Morgan.

Australian investor Reinventure has backed Auror for similar reasons. Danny Gilligan, managing director of Reinventure, says Auror’s solution will have global appeal.

“The founders of Auror have a great team and product, and have brought together a great shareholder base who can add value far beyond the dollar amount invested. We’re excited about what Auror will achieve in the next 12 to 18 months,” says Gilligan.

“Auror gives businesses the tools they need to help them to proactively combat crime. With Auror, even a relatively simple task such as reporting an incident to the police provides significant savings, reducing the average time taken from 90 minutes to less than ten minutes,” says Thomson.

Auror also enables businesses to partner with the Police to prevent crime. In the past, high volume crime has often gone unreported, so the information is never connected, providing anonymity to offenders and organised crime groups. Auror digitises these previously manual processes, connecting information in a smarter way. As businesses report incidents online, the software connects the dots on organised criminal activity in real-time and then provides this information to the right people in a more actionable way, explains Thomson.

“Our vision is to empower everyone to play their part in reducing crime,” says Thomson.

ENDS

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