Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

NZ beef exports to Taiwan rise to record

NZ beef exports to Taiwan rise to a record, propelling it to 3rd largest market

By Tina Morrison

Feb. 10 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand beef exports to Taiwan rose to a record in 2015, propelling it to the country’s third-largest beef market behind the US and China.

In 2015, New Zealand’s beef exports to Taiwan jumped 36 percent to $188.6 million, while the volume increased 20 percent to 23,442 tonnes, according to Statistics New Zealand data compiled by the Meat Industry Association. That pushed it above Japan in value and ahead of Japan and Korea in volume to become the country’s third-largest beef market.

Taiwan also takes higher-value meat, with an average value last year of US$5.68 per kilogram, compared with US$5.08/kg for the US, and US$4.94/kg for China, according to AgriHQ data.

New Zealand’s trade with Taiwan has accelerated since an ANZTEC economic cooperation agreement came into force in December 2013. That’s seen it jump to New Zealand’s seventh-largest export market for merchandise trade, up from the 10th largest in 2013.

The agreement saw the tariff on New Zealand beef cut to zero, from a previous rate of about 46 cents per kilogram per cubic metre. Trade Minister Todd McClay said the latest figures demonstrate the many benefits that trade agreements deliver for the New Zealand economy and shows why the government continues to promote a progressive free-trade agenda.

Local exporters may have been diverting product away from Japan and Korea, historically the second and third largest markets but where economic growth has been weak and where they face competition from Australia and the US, analysts said.

“It’s really changing the face of our markets at the moment,” said Nick Handley, senior analyst at AgriHQ. “It used to be quite normal for 10 years or so that the US was miles in front and then South Korea and Japan pretty comfortably taking number two and three - now China is on board, Taiwan is number three and Malaysia is steadily climbing onto the radar.”

Last year, the US took about half New Zealand's 443,142 tonnes of beef exports, while China took about 17 percent. Taiwan and Canada each took about 5 percent of export volumes, while Korea and Japan each took 4 percent.

Handley said he expects China to remain the second-largest market, with Taiwan, Canada and South Korea remaining close, and Japan continuing to hold the sixth position.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Up 0.5% In June Quarter: Services Lead GDP Growth

“Service industries, which represent about two-thirds of the economy, were the main contributor to GDP growth in the quarter, rising 0.7 percent off the back of a subdued result in the March 2019 quarter.” More>>

ALSO:

Pickers: Letter To Immigration Minister From Early Harvesting Growers

A group of horticultural growers are frustrated by many months of inaction by the Minister who has failed to announce additional immigrant workers from overseas will be allowed into New Zealand to assist with harvesting early stage crops such as asparagus and strawberries. More>>

ALSO:

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO: