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New Course Helps Creatives Turn Passion Into Business

New Course Helps Creatives Turn Passion Into Business




Lifetime Creative Founder Logan Elliott.

15 June 2016

New Zealand creative entrepreneur Logan Elliott is launching a new online course to help teach creatives how to make a viable business from their artistic passions.

“I’ve been in the creative industries for many years,” says Logan, “and what I’ve come to realise is that although there are enormously talented artists, musicians, designers, and entertainers out there, many of them struggle to build a viable business out of their talent.”

“My passion is to help others pursue theirs, so that’s what I’m out to help them with.”

Elliott’s experience borders across creative endeavours and entrepreneurship.

“I’m a creative myself but I also love business and entrepreneurship. Success, as they say, is about being able to blur the lines of work and play, and I think entrepreneurs in the creative industries do this best.”

The 28-year-old New Zealander founded events entertainment company Highly Flammable in 2010, and lectures entrepreneurship at Otago University.

He’s now offering to share his experience with a new online-course through his consultancy company Lifetime Creative.

The Creative Business Masterclass will teach students the fundamentals of good business, specifically tailored for the creative industries. The course will be run remotely via videos, online Skype sessions, and shared documents over the cloud.



It’s an eight week course and Elliott says it’s a “must-do” for creatives of any type wanting to pursue their art as a career.

“The masterclass will teach everything I’ve learnt in the past decade in an engaging crash course condensed to just two months.

“I’ve been running one-to-one consultancy for years now, but this is the first group course I’ve done and that means it’s going to be accessible to a lot more people. It’s designed to be flexible and fit around people’s studies or full-time job.

“Students will be put through their paces with a series of challenges. There’ll be a strong community aspect to the course where students can collaborate to help get through the challenges together.”

Logan has created a lifestyle which allows him to be a “digital nomad”: a person who is not bound to a city or country to run their businesses.

He runs his businesses remotely, coordinating his New Zealand based team from around the world. He’s currently travelling in South East Asia, but keeps New Zealand as his home base for the majority of the year.

The Creative Business Masterclass course begins in July and places are limited. People interested in signing up can do so at LifetimeCreative.co or by contacting Logan via email.

ENDS

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