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Crucial NZ Calculates Exact Amount of SSD Storage Needed

Crucial NZ calculates exactly the right amount of SSD storage for all users

Demonstrates how to buy the right amount of GB for your SSD needs and budget


AUCKLAND, 13 September 2016 – According to Crucial NZ choosing the right size SSD can be overwhelming but it doesn’t have to be. While the largest capacity drive is always preferable, the storage manufacturer says you simply have to balance your needs, gigabytes (GB) and budget.

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Micron Consumer Products Group Marketing Manager APAC Mathew Luu explained, “Just like storing physical items in your house or apartment, you need enough digital space to account for what you currently have, along with room for new data that you’ll naturally and constantly accumulate over time. At a minimum, most people need at least 240GB to store enough data now and into the future.”

Crucial has come up with five quick questions to help you buy wisely and find the right size SSD for you.

Firstly, what’s the approximate total capacity (in GB) of your current hard drive or SSD?

Luu said, “This matters as an SSD needs to be at least as big as your current drive to hold all of its content and there are simple ways to find this out. For Windows® users, click Start, then click Computer to find out. For Mac® system users, click the Apple logo on the left side of the menu bar at the top of the screen, then click About this Mac to find out. Typical capacities are 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB and more than 1TB.”

Secondly how many GB are you using on your current hard drive or SSD?

Luu explained, “You need enough space to transfer everything over to your new drive without having to decide what you will keep or delete – for many people, that’s at least 240GB to maintain all their old files and accommodate some new ones while not spending too much money.”

How do you find this out? Follow the same process that you did for question one, but this time you’re looking to see how much of your drive’s available storage space you’ve actually used. Estimate your percentage by looking at the capacity bar that’s displayed next to your drive or by comparing the amount of GB you’ve used to the drive’s total capacity.

Crucial’s third question is how frequently do you add new media to your computer i.e. upload photos and videos from your phone, download movies and games, etc.?

To which Luu added, “Media files are inherently large, so the more you’re adding new media to your drive, the more storage you’ll need. An SSD is a long-term investment and the number of photos, songs, videos, games, renderings, and files you’ll add is ever-growing – and so are the sizes of those files. It’s critical to remember that your primary drive holds all of these types of media in addition to the other files, apps, documents, and your operating system that keeps things running.”

According to Crucial’s experts a fairly good guide as to what you can fit into 1GB of storage at today’s file sizes sits at around 83 photos + 74 songs + 4 minutes and 10 seconds of SD video.

The fourth question revolves around apps and activities that consume a lot of storage so are you a big gamer, or do you use photo editing and video editing a lot?

Why? Luu explained, “Gaming, photo editing, and video editing all require more system resources and can greatly benefit from larger capacities and faster performance.”

Finally, what’s your budget for a new SSD?

Although this may seem like an obvious question Mathew Luu had a different take on the answer as he concluded, “The largest capacity drive is always preferable, but if it’s not always practical for your budget, why pay for more than you need? Stick to what you can afford and make it work for you. With storage the aim is to get the right drive for you and by asking these five questions, you can easily find the size SSD for your needs and budget. In other words don’t just buy big – buy right.”

Crucial has a wide range of SSD including the newly launched 275GB Crucial® MX300 SSD, 525GB Crucial® MX300 SSD and 1050GB Crucial® MX300 SSD.

For more information on Crucial’s MX300 SSD go to: http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/storage-ssd-mx300

Ends


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