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EPA opens submissions on TTR iron sand application

EPA opens submissions on Trans-Tasman Resources iron sand application
The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) is calling for submissions on a Trans-Tasman Resources Limited (TTRL) application for marine consents and marine discharge consents for activities associated with extracting and processing iron sand in the South Taranaki Bight.

The application area covers 65.7 square kilometres of seabed 22-36 kilometres offshore, in waters between 20m and 42m deep.

TTRL proposes to extract and process up to 50 million tonnes of seabed material from an approximately five square kilometre area per year, and exporting up to 5 million tonnes of iron ore concentrate annually for up to 35 years. The remaining de-ored sediment (around 45 million tonnes per year) would be returned to the seabed in the same area from which it was extracted.

TTRL’s application will be notified on Saturday, 17 September 2016 by public notice in major daily newspapers, two daily regional newspapers, and the EPA website.

EPA Chief Executive, Allan Freeth, says the EPA Board has appointed a Decision Making Committee (DMC) to consider the application and hear submissions. “The Decision Making Committee will consider all public submissions and provide opportunities for people to speak to their submissions at public hearings,” Dr Freeth said.

The DMC members are Alick Shaw (Chair), Kevin Thompson (EPA Board representative), Sharon McGarry, and Gerry Te Kapa Coates.
Details of TTRL’s application, a guide to making submissions, information issued by the DMC, and a range of other information is available on the EPA website. Regular updates on the progress of the application will also be available on the website.



See details about the application and how to make a submission.

What we do
Under the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 (EEZ Act), the EPA is responsible for regulating the effects of certain restricted activities on the environment and existing interests in the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf. The purpose of the EEZ Act is to promote the sustainable management of the area’s natural resources.
The EPA considers marine consent applications, monitors EEZ Act compliance and any conditions on marine consents, carries out enforcement, and promotes public awareness of the EEZ Act.


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