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Industry keen to resolve complex fisheries issues

September 20, 2016

Industry keen to resolve complex fisheries issues

Returning fish to the sea is a complex issue that occurs in both commercial and recreational fisheries, says the Chief Executive of Fisheries Inshore New Zealand, Dr Jeremy Helson.

“The reasons are varied. Sometimes it is legally required, sometimes it is discretionary and sometimes it is unlawful.

“The fact that this issue has remained unresolved for decades whilst being known to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is indicative of these complexities,” Dr Helson says.

Industry has in the past been involved in discussions with MPI to address the issues and is keen to sit down now again and resolve them.

Just as these issues are complex, there are a range of solutions which industry has identified that could address the underlying causes of this problem,” Dr Helson says.

“It’s a matter of understanding the various incentives and disincentives to find the appropriate solutions.”

There had been much discussion about the use of electronic monitoring to address illegal discarding, he said.

“We are supportive of initiatives that provide greater transparency around our operations. For example, individual companies have invested in a trial of electronic monitoring of fishing vessels in the Auckland snapper fishery.

“Electronic monitoring on vessels is part of the solution, but it is unlikely to be the whole answer. There are a number of legal and policy issues to be addressed to ensure the settings are right for the widespread use of electronic monitoring. We welcome the opportunity to discuss these with MPI as one important piece of the puzzle.”


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