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Kotahi partners with Cape Sanctuary

6 December 2016

Kotahi partners with Cape Sanctuary

Kotahi, the country’s largest export supply chain collaboration, has signed a long-term partnership with Cape Sanctuary, a significant wildlife restoration programme at Cape Kidnappers, in a bid to protect native New Zealand birds.

Cape Sanctuary Co-founder Andy Lowe said Kotahi’s partnership will allow two additional New Zealand native species, the near extinct Shore Plover and endangered Blue Duck, to be included in the Cape Sanctuary programme.

“Our philosophy is to develop long-standing partnerships with businesses, iwi and Department of Conservation to restore native bird life to our region. Cape Sanctuary began as a project by people passionate about bringing back and sustaining native species that once would have existed on the Cape Kidnappers peninsula and nearby coastal communities.

“We’re excited to partner with Kotahi, an organisation that shares our values and beliefs. Their involvement gave us the commitment required to build the Kotahi Aviary, with support from Department of Conservation. The new aviary is a significant step for Cape Sanctuary enabling us to grow the programme and set new goals for the regeneration of these important native birds,” he said.

Department of Conservation Operations Director Mr Kemper said “Having a business like Kotahi working with Cape Sanctuary and the Department of Conservation, to protect our natural environment, is very important if we are going to achieve increased levels of protection for New Zealand’s rare and endangered species. This is a fantastic initiative and another example of the great conservation going on in the Hawke’s Bay.”

Kotahi’s partnership will enable the everyday running of the aviary and support a research project to better understand how these unique New Zealand birds can be re-established back into the wild.

Kotahi Chief Executive David Ross says that the partnership with Cape Sanctuary is a natural fit for Kotahi.

“We collaborate with customers and logistics partners to create a supply chain that drives down carbon emissions and focuses on sustainable practices, moving cargo from manufacturing sites, across land and sea, to customers around the world.

“We believe it is important for New Zealanders and New Zealand companies to take steps to protect our unique native species. In supporting the Cape Sanctuary initiative we’re proud to be part of a talented group of people investing both volunteer time and a love of New Zealand’s wildlife, to ensure that future generations have the chance to experience native species in their natural habitat.

“It is the long-term goal of the partnership to see Shore Plovers and Blue Ducks released back into predator-free environments around New Zealand,” he said.

The native Shore Plover (Tuturuatu), one of the world’s rarest shorebirds, was chosen as part of the Cape Sanctuary project because it is near extinction, with approximately 175 adult birds including 70 breeding pairs, left in New Zealand. [Source: nzbirdsonline.org.nz]

New Zealand’s iconic Blue Duck (Whio), a nationally vulnerable species that risks extinction with a population of less than 3,000, has been impacted greatly by pest predation. Whio are an ancient species of waterfowl, considered taonga (treasured), holding a strong cultural, spiritual and historic connection with New Zealand. [Source: doc.govt.nz]

ENDS


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