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New Zealand dog diet study a wake-up call for dog nutrition

MEDIA RELEASE

New Zealand Premium Petfood Alliance

New Zealand dog diet study a wake-up call for dog nutrition

March 16 2017

Dog owners can improve the wellbeing of their canine companions by serving up a high meat diet rather than the “human-like” fare favoured by many, a new study shows.

The independent New Zealand study – only the second of its kind in the world – found the high meat diet is easier for dogs to digest, means more nutrients are able to be absorbed, and resulted in higher levels of bacteria associated with protein and fat digestion.

These higher levels of bacteria demonstrated a dog’s gut is biologically designed to digest a diet high in meat.

Led by AgResearch and Massey University, and co-funded by the New Zealand Premium Petfood Alliance (a collaboration between leading NZ Petfood manufacturers Bombay Petfoods, K9 Natural and ZiwiPeak) and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment through the Outcomes for Science Targeted Research Fund, the study also shows there may have been too much reliance on research into the diets of humans or other animals in the past when it comes to the best diet for dogs.

“We already know dogs have no nutritional need for carbohydrates in their diet, so this study looked at the role different bacteria play in a dog’s digestion system to help us work toward a clearer picture of what the optimum diet for dogs is,” said study co-lead Dr Emma Bermingham of AgResearch.

“Understanding how bacteria works in the gut is vital because of its links to digestion, diseases such as obesity, and even how it affects mood and behaviour.”

The study found:

High meat diets are more digestible for dogs

More nutrients from a high meat diet are able to be absorbed

Dogs on a high meat diet had higher levels of the bacteria associated with protein and fat digestion

Dogs on a high meat diet had smaller poo and better fecal health

Study co-lead Associate Professor David Thomas of Massey University said finding high levels of the bacteria associated with protein and fat digestion was particularly exciting as it demonstrated that a dog’s gut is biologically designed to digest high meat diets.

“Up until now science has looked at studies on nutrient digestion in human, mice and rats and assumed the same is true for dogs in terms of digestion and what is good and bad bacteria in the gut. This study shows this may not the case and much more needs to be done to understand the digestive system of dogs and the long-term health consequences of feeding different diets.”

New Zealand Premium Petfood Alliance spokesperson Neil Hinton said the study findings support the view the pet food manufactures behind the Alliance have been advocating for a long time.

“While dogs are considered members of the family, they are carnivores so shouldn’t be fed a humanised diet containing high levels of carbohydrates. The study supports our long-held view that dogs need to be fed a high meat, low carbohydrate diet best suited to their biological makeup.”

Mr Hinton said there is growing interest from pet owners about biologically appropriate diets that lead to healthier and happier pets.

“To date there has been hardly any published research, so this study is a significant contribution to the international animal nutrition field. A lot of diets on the market have been designed to ensure a dog survives, but this research shows that high meat diet is the best to help a dog thrive.”

Notes for editors

The research ‘Key bacterial families (Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and Bacteroidacae) are related to the digestion of protein and energy in the dog’ is published in the PeerJ journal https://peerj.com/articles/3019/

Dogs in the study were either fed a high meat raw complete and balanced diet or a high quality kibble (dry) diet.

The study is part of a three-year independent New Zealand research programme led by AgResearch and Massey University and co-funded by the New Zealand Premium Petfood Alliance and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment through the MBIE Outcomes for Science Targeted Research Fund to assist the red meat pet food industry to grow their exports.

The next full study from the research programme on the effects of feeding cats a high meat diet is due for completion mid-2017.

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