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Kiwis misled by migration myths in election year

April 4, 2017

MEDIA RELEASE

Kiwis misled by migration myths in election year

Kiwis are being misled about migration in a political game that is all about winning votes through the propaganda fed to us, says Ms June Ranson chair of the New Zealand Association for Migration and Investment (NZAMI).

“One of the big myths being pedalled by politicians is that migration numbers are increasing and having a negative impact on housing shortages, house prices, infrastructure, job shortages and job competition.

“All of this propaganda is painting a totally false picture of the situation. It is alarming the public and causing the current Government to react to show they are listening and competing in the ‘game’ to win the election.”

NZAMI, New Zealand's leading professional association for immigration specialists, says this negative publicity towards migrants could be costly for New Zealand.

“The political parties know that there is a cost to high levels of immigration but it is greatly outweighed by the benefits that migrants bring to NZ.”

Ms Ranson says that the statistics provided by Statistics NZ and released recently by the NZ Initiative show that, as at June 2016, New Zealanders returning home was one of the main reasons people were coming into the country.

• 31% for work only – temporary stay

• 29% NZ & Australian citizens (New Zealanders returning home)

• 22% international students

• 12% residence – migrants here for the long term

• 5% visitor

• 1% other

“New Zealand’s positive economic climate means thousands of Kiwis are choosing to move back home, even as fewer choose to leave.”

Ms Ranson says migrants contributed a net $2.9 billion to the government’s books in 2013.

“One would assume that in the past three years these figures have increased. On a per capita level, this would be equivalent to $2,653 per migrant. Native-born New Zealanders contributed a net $540 million to the country’s revenue or $172 per person.

Ms Ranson says the economic benefit of migrants has not decreased and the country needs them because productivity by the average New Zealander is low by comparison.

“If there are pressures on housing and other infrastructure why was there not better planning by successive governments to support the economic development of the country? Are migrants just a convenient scapegoat for poor planning?” asks Ms Ranson.

About NZAMI

The NZAMI is made up of lawyers and licensed immigration advisers who must uphold professional standards and comply with the Association’s strict Code of Ethics. This Code requires them to uphold the integrity of the New Zealand immigration system and to respect the vulnerability of migrants at all times. For more information please see: www.nzami.co.nz.

Ends


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