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PEPANZ Disappointed by Latest Greenpeace Media Stunt

PEPANZ Disappointed by Latest Greenpeace Media Stunt


The Petroleum Exploration and Production Association of New Zealand (PEPANZ) says it is disappointed by the latest media stunt from Greenpeace protestors, who today jumped into the water in front of the seismic survey vessel Amazon Warrior.

PEPANZ Chief Executive Cameron Madgwick says the Amazon Warrior is operating about 50-kilometres off the coast of the North Island and is towing several large streamers, which stretch many kilometres behind it.

"The size of the Amazon Warrior makes it difficult for it to stop or turn quickly. That is why the vessel is operating with a 500-metre non-interference zone," says Mr Madgwick.

"While the actions of the protestors were not a surprise and had been planned for, the protestors put themselves into a potentially dangerous situation by placing themselves in the vessels path.

"While we absolutely respect the right of Greenpeace to protest, this sort of action is just stupid.

"Climate change is a serious issue and it requires governments, energy companies, NGOs and environmental groups to work together to find answers.

"We have attempted to engage Greenpeace in this discussion, including inviting them to the New Zealand Petroleum Conference. They have, however, declined these invitations and instead focussed their attention on protests and raising their profile through stunts such as those witnessed today.

"While that is their right, the reality is the world’s energy demand is growing and we simply cannot switch off our use of fossil fuels overnight.

"Oil and gas are not only used in transport, but also to heat our homes, cook our food and create a huge range of essential goods.

"For example, Greenpeace themselves are using diesel to fuel their vessels and the life jackets the protestors are wearing will be made from petroleum by-products. The radios and cellphones they are using, the binoculars aboard their vessel will all contain products made from oil."

Mr Madgwick says New Zealand is underexplored by international standards and the work that the Amazon Warrior is undertaking will help us understand better what petroleum reserves we might have.

"Oil and gas could deliver enormous economic benefit to New Zealanders. A significant find could result in billions of dollars in new investment, more highly skilled jobs for our young people and provide increased taxes and royalties to fund government services."

Ends


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