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Informative and hands-on apiculture event set to inspire


Thursday 22 June, 2017

Informative and hands-on apiculture event set to inspire and educate

There is something for everyone at the event of the year for New Zealand’s apiculture industry.

The Apiculture New Zealand National Conference will be held at the Rotorua Energy Events Centre from 9 July to 11 July 2017, gathering hobbyist and commercial beekeepers, honey packers and anyone with an interest in apiculture from around the country and abroad.

Attendees can sign up for the event’s interactive workshops from making mead to cooking with honey. New beekeepers will come away with practical advice on the potential challenges they face in their first few years in the industry and experienced beekeepers can benefit from a refresher on the American Foulbrood, the most serious honey bee disease in New Zealand.

The National Honey Show is one of the highlights of the annual conference, showcasing honey varieties and other hive products. Last year there were a large number of submitted entries, all vying for top position in 20 distinct categories, from naturally granulated honey to cut comb honey sections.

The conference serves as a forum and knowledge hub for issues that impact on bees and the beekeeping industry. This year’s theme is “Bee-ing Prepared: Business: Knowledge: Risk.”

American beekeeper, researcher and scientist Randy Oliver and Dr Yves Le Conte from the French National Bee Laboratory, France will share their expertise on some of the threats to bee populations, while New Zealand’s leading specialists on bee health will also take the stage.

Representatives from the Environmental Protection Authority and the Department of Conservation will talk about biodiversity and the effect of chemical applications.

Lending a global business perspective, Iain McLeod from International Trade Specialist Bank of New Zealand will speak on trends and challenges in the international market.

The arrival of myrtle rust in New Zealand and the Ministry for Primary Industries’ science definition for mānuka honey are expected to be among the most current topics that will steer the conversations.

“We are excited about the broad range of subjects that will be covered this year,” says Karin Kos, Apiculture New Zealand chief executive. “This is an enormous opportunity for people to build on their knowledge and network with others in the industry.”

ends

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