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Reckon partners with TidyStock for SME stock management


Reckon partners with TidyStock for SME stock management


Cloud accounting provider Reckon has signed a deal with Tidy International to integrate its cloud-based stock and inventory management system, TidyStock, into Reckon One.

The partnership will offer Reckon One customers the ability to efficiently use and track their stocks and inventory anywhere, anytime.

Catie Cotcher, General Manager Reckon NZ, says TidyStock takes the hassle out of inventory management for SMEs, especially those in the manufacturing, wholesale and retail industry.

“For a lot of SMEs around New Zealand, stocktake is a necessary yet time-consuming part of the job, and it requires accuracy to avoid running out of stock and missed sales.

“TidyStock works with your cloud accounting software to track resources and manage stock for you and even sends re-order alerts when supplies are getting low which allows for much greater control of margins. Because it ties in with your cloud accounting software, it also manages stock related invoices,” says Cotcher.

She says the add-on app also addresses the needs of around 15 percent of Reckon’s existing customer base, who could not previously move to Reckon One without this key functionality.
Debbie Marshall, from Business Solutions in Christchurch, who advises a wide range of businesses in the Canterbury region, says using a system like TidyStock will help SMEs run their operations more efficiently.
“The benefits are huge for someone like a tradie for example because it will save them having to work with on another system to manage product, stock and other resources. It frees up time to do their core work and grow their business.
“The system also manages stock invoices easily within Reckon One, so this takes away the woes and worries of double entry and data discrepancies when documenting expenditure.”

Marshall says TidyStock is a flexible inventory system that can be used for single or multiple locations, managing even the most complex stock handling requirements.

“TidyStock is great as it is flexible enough to work for a self-employed tradie managing weekly supplies, through to larger manufacturing companies selling hundreds of products daily,” she says.


-Ends-

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