Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Kaikoura Earthquake Commemoration a Time for Reflection

Earthquake Commemoration a Time for Reflection

The 12 months since a 7.8 earthquake struck near Kaikoura devastating the Main North Line railway have been enormously challenging, but a year on it is pleasing to see progress made, delivering some respite for residents and truck drivers, KiwiRail Chief Executive Peter Reidy says.

“It’s been a tough time for everyone involved, but the spirit of the locals and dedicated work from the 1500 people working on the rail and road rebuild effort is really starting to pay off.

“Despite some of the worst winter weather in years affecting our freight programme, more than 8500 tonnes of freight has now been shifted on the line, which will lower supply chain costs for our customers. It has also meant 1200 fewer truck trips on the vulnerable inland routes.

“We are also helping with the rebuild by delivering critical components for the road reconstruction directly into the worksite. Rail has moved tonnes of precast concrete blocks for sea walls, adapting wagons to carry them.

"That's important work as it helps with the reopening of the road which is now set for December 15.

“I want to pay tribute to the strength of the people in all of the communities hit by the quake,” Mr Reidy says.

“These communities have faced significant upheaval and hardship, yet their hospitality and support has been overwhelming.

“Without their support we would not have made the progress we have, and we are committed to continuing the work to complete the job as soon as possible.

“Getting trains moving again was the result of the commitment from our own people and those in the NCTIR alliance ¬- all of the alliance workers, NZTA and contractors.

“We are hoping to have our passenger tourism service, the Coastal Pacific, running again from mid next year, once the rebuild work is complete."

The rail line between Blenheim and Christchurch was reopened on September 15, enabling a limited low frequency service to resume between Picton and Christchurch. Exceptional weather affected early services but trains are now running regularly. The services run at night to enable work to continue during the day on both State Highway One, and to continue to bring the rail line up to full operating capacity.

The MNL is a critical link in New Zealand’s transport networks and before the earthquake more than one million tonnes of freight was being moved on it each year.


Facts at a glance

Restoring the Main North Line has involved one of the biggest rail rebuilds since World War II:

• More than 100 slips and landslides cleared.
• Repairs needed at more than 750 individual sites, including 60 major damage sites.
• 20 tunnels and 60 bridges damaged.
• Since 15 September 58 train services have run, and we have moved 8853 tonnes of freight (net weight) – equivalent to 1200 truck trips.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

57 Million Users' Data: Uber Breach "Utterly Preventatable"

Cybersecurity leader Centrify says the Uber data breach of 57 million customer and driver records - which the ride-hailing company hid for more than a year - was “utterly preventable”. More>>

Scoop 3.0: How You Can Help Scoop’s Evolution

We have big plans for 2018 as we look to expand our public interest journalism coverage, upgrade our publishing infrastructure and offer even more valuable business tools to commercial users of Scoop. More>>

Having A Cow? Dairy Product Prices Slide For Fourth Straight Auction

Dairy product prices fell at the Global Dairy Trade auction, retreating for the fourth straight auction amid signs of increased production... Whole milk powder fell 2.7 percent to US$2,778 a tonne. More>>

ALSO:

Statistics: Butter At Record $5.67/Block; High Vegetable Prices

Rising dairy prices have pushed food prices up 2.7 percent in the year to October 2017, Stats NZ said today. This followed a 3.0 percent increase in the year to September 2017. More>>

ALSO:

Science: New Research Finds Herbicides Cause Antibiotic Resistance

New University of Canterbury research confirms that the active ingredients of the commonly used herbicides, RoundUp, Kamba and 2,4-D (glyphosate, dicamba and 2,4-D, respectively), each alone cause antibiotic resistance at concentrations well below label application rates. More>>

ALSO:

CO2 And Water: Fonterra (And Dairy NZ)'s Environment Plans

Federated Farmers support Fonterra’s bold push to get to zero emissions of CO2 on the manufacturing side of the Co-operative, both in New Zealand and across its global network. More>>

ALSO: