Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Wā Collective Brings Menstrual Cups to the People of NZ

Wā Collective Brings Menstrual Cups to the People of New Zealand

To coincide with yesterday’s International Women’s Day, social enterprise Wā Collective launched their menstrual cups nationwide, furthering their mission of ending New Zealand’s ‘period poverty’.

Founder Olie Body started the company in June 2017 after a survey of 1,000 students in Wellington showed that one-third of menstruators had skipped class because they did not have access to menstrual products.

“That survey blew us away, we had no idea the scale of the problem,” says Body. She describes ‘period poverty’ as a result of socio-economic issues like financial hardship, the housing shortage and inflation.

For every Wā cup purchased (RRP $49) the cost to a student will be subsidized to $15.

With 100% medical grade silicone, an ethical and zero waste production facility and a lifespan of 10 years, this makes a student’s cost of menstrual products $1.50 per year, compared to an average $100 - $300.

“Our partnerships with Victoria and Massey Universities in Wellington, Massey University campuses in Palmerston North and Albany, and Lincoln University in Canterbury have been key to accessing students directly through associations and campus health services.”

To date Wā Collective has sold 300 cups, saving students $26,000 in menstrual costs per year and preventing 72,000 disposable products from entering our landfills in 2018.

"It's a great initiative tailored to the needs of young people who are struggling financially and juggling a lot. It's a small contribution but makes a huge difference especially in the long run," says a student who participated in a recent survey.

Later this year, Wā Collective are looking to partner with other organisations to bring subsidised cups to a range of vulnerable groups and communities around the country.

“It’s a win-win for our people and our environment,” says Body, who in 2014 lived in India and helped establish initial training for women in rural West Bengal to make their own menstrual products.

As of 08 March 2018, Wā Cups will be stocked in a number of online and physical retailers.

For more information on where to purchase a cup of your own, visit


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Transport Tech: Roadmap To Harness $1.5 Bn Sector

A new Future Technology Leadership Group will help New Zealand harness some of the $1.5 billion a year estimated value to the economy from Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) as well as the social benefits they create... More>>


Economy: GDP Rises On Strength In Services

The economy, as measured by gross domestic product (GDP), grew 0.6 percent in the December 2017 quarter, Stats NZ said today. Growth was driven by increases in the service industries but was tempered by falls in the primary sector. More>>


Innovative Partnerships:Govt Launches R&D Programme

Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods has today formally launched the Innovative Partnership programme which aims to attract future-focused international innovators and firms to undertake R&D and develop their products in New Zealand.... More>>


Planes And Oil: Current Account Deficit Widens To $2.0 Billion

New Zealand's seasonally adjusted current account deficit widened to $2.0 billion in the December 2017 quarter, Stats NZ said today. The $407 million increase in the deficit was mainly driven by New Zealand importing aircraft and other transport equipment, and crude oil. More>>


RMTU: Lyttelton Port Strike

Sticking points now include LPC’s insistence on docking the pay of workers who didn’t take part in strike action last week – because they withdrew the strike notice. “In our view this amounts to an illegal lockout.” More>>


"Licensed To Krill": Greenpeace Report On Antarctic Fishing

A new Greenpeace investigation has exposed the environmental risks of the fast-growing krill industry in one of the most pristine parts of the Antarctic Ocean. More>>