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2degrees switches off 2G network this Thursday


MEDIA RELEASE

12 March 2018


2degrees switches off 2G network this Thursday, March 15


On Thursday, March 15th, 2degrees will turn off its 2G mobile network.

Devices that only connect via 2G will cease to operate. They will no longer be able to make or receive calls or texts, or call emergency services (111). Phones and devices that use 3G or 4G are not affected and will continue to operate as they do today.

2degrees CEO Stewart Sherriff says most 2G customers have already upgraded their devices, as the company stopped selling 2G devices in 2015.

“We are making this change to better serve the majority of our customers’ needs and keep up with their demand for 4G services. Our 4G network offers data speeds that are around a thousand times faster than the 2G network, which was used mainly for calls and texts.”

Customers can contact 2degrees with questions or visit 2dm.co.nz/2g to check if their mobile phone is a 2G handset and what their upgrade options are. As a general rule, 2G only mobiles are not smartphones. 2degrees operates 3G and 4G networks across New Zealand and provides 98.5% population coverage. With demand for faster services increasing every week, the company will reallocate the airwaves used by 2G to ensure its fastest network keeps up with demand.

“Customers today want to download video, access social media and to back up their devices to the cloud. None of that existed when we launched with our 2G network - back then the most exciting thing you could do was make a phone call or send a text message. Today’s customers want more and tomorrow’s customers will want things we can’t envision yet. We want to provide the network that delivers the future for them.”


ENDS

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