Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Survey shows proposed employment law changes go too far


05 April 2018


Survey shows proposed employment law changes go too far


A recent survey conducted by law firm Simpson Grierson found that most employers strongly believe the Employment Relations Act is working well in its current form and does not need a major overhaul.

Sent out last month, the survey was designed to gauge employer opinions around the changes proposed in the Employment Relations Amendment Bill 2018.

Partner Phillipa Muir and Senior Associate Rebecca Rendle, say the responses clearly demonstrate that employers are generally happy with the Act and are concerned about the implications of several of the proposed changes in the new Bill.

“Based on the responses, it’s clear that employers are receptive of efforts to improve workplace fairness and protection for employees,” says Muir.

“However in areas such as union access to workplaces and employee trial periods, the vast majority of respondents view the proposed changes as too far reaching and believe they would unreasonably impact their ability to manage business operations.”

Key findings from the survey include:

· 87% of respondents agree or strongly agree that union representatives should have an employer’s consent before entering a workplace;

· 80% of respondents disagree or strongly disagree that reinstatement should be restored as the primary remedy for unjustified dismissal;

· 87% of respondents agree or strongly agree that employers should have the ability to offer an Individual Employment Agreement alongside a Collective Agreement; and

· 76% of respondents thought that 90 day trial periods should continue to apply to all employers or to those with fewer than 50 employees.

The law firm says the Employment Relations Act is an important piece of legislation that underpins and safeguards working relationships for most New Zealanders. Therefore, any changes need to be carefully considered.

“The changes currently proposed in the Employment Relations Amendment Bill haven’t yet struck the right balance in protecting parties on both sides of this relationship and the changes go further than employers believe is necessary or appropriate,” says Rendle.

“We are hopeful that this balance will be identified and addressed during the Select Committee process.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Climate Summary: NZ’s Equal-2nd Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (+0.51°C to +1.20°C above the annual average) across the majority of New Zealand... 2018 was the equal 2nd-warmest year on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which began in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

GDP: Economic Growth Dampens In The September Quarter

Gross domestic product (GDP) rose 0.3 percent in the September 2018 quarter, down from 1.0 percent in the previous quarter, Stats NZ said today... GDP per capita was flat in the September 2018 quarter, following an increase of 0.5 percent in the June 2018 quarter. More>>

ALSO:

Up $1.20: $17.70 Minimum Wage For 2019

Coalition Government signals how it will move toward its goal of a $20 p/h minimum wage by 2021... “Today we are announcing that the minimum wage will increase to $17.70 an hour on 1 April 2019." More>>

ALSO:

Retail: IKEA To Open In New Zealand

Inter IKEA Systems B.V. is today announcing its intentions to grant the Ingka Group exclusive rights to explore expansion opportunities in New Zealand. More>>