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Another Kiwi startup making the leap over the ditch

Move over Xero, there’s another Kiwi startup making the leap over the ditch.

Weirdly, a clever recruiting software that assesses fit between candidates and companies, is already working with some of New Zealand’s biggest employers - companies like The Warehouse Group, NZME, Bunnings, and BNZ. Now following in the footsteps of other Kiwi tech-stars like Xero and Vend, Weirdly is looking across the Tasman for their next phase of growth.

“We’ve been seeing a huge spike in approaches from big Australian companies over the past year so it’s a natural step to establish a base there” says Weirdly CEO and co-founder, Dale Clareburt.

“There’s a real appetite for tools like ours that help these big companies manage the huge volume of applications they get and make the application experience a lot nicer for candidates”

The new Australian presence, based in Sydney will be headed up by Sascha Gray. With deep experience in HR Technology, Sascha’s an employment industry mainstay who previously led the growth of Hired,Inc in the APAC region.

Clareburt says that niche experience was exactly what Weirdly was looking for in their new VP of Sales. She’s an HR Tech expert, which is supported by a real understanding of recruiters’ needs and day-to-day frustrations.

“We’re chuffed to get someone of Sascha’s ability and experience on board. She’s exactly the right person to help grow Weirdly’s presence in the Australian market”.

With Gray leading growth for Australia, Clareburt continues to increase Weirdly’s presence in the USA while the product development continues in New Zealand. It looks like this Kiwi’s wings are working just fine.


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