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Recognising outstanding contributions to NZ forestry

Media Statement

NZ Institute of Forestry recognises outstanding contributions of individuals to New Zealand forestry

The NZ Institute of Forestry recognised the contribution of two of its outstanding leaders at its Annual Awards Dinner in Nelson last night. Peter Clark of Rotorua received the NZIF Forester of the Year award. The award recognises an Institute member who has made an outstanding contribution to either the forestry profession, or the forestry sector over the last 12 months. The award recognises leadership, excellence and personal integrity, particularly where this demonstrates the character and strength of the forestry profession, and it is one of the highest accolades the Institute can bestow. “The Forester of the Year award is a fitting recognition of the contribution that Peter Clark has made to the sector over a large number of years”, said the President, David Evison.

Russell Dale (also of Rotorua) was awarded the Kirk Horn and medal. The Kirk Horn Flask is the most historically valuable award in all New Zealand science. The NZ Institute of Forestry awards the Kirk Horn every second year, to recognise outstanding contributions in the field of forestry in New Zealand. “Russell has proved himself to be an outstanding leader in forest management and in the management of major industry-funded forestry research programmes, over a long and distinguished career”, Dr Evison noted. “The NZ Institute of Forestry is delighted to celebrate the achievements and contributions to New Zealand forestry of Peter Clark and Russell Dale.”

The election of Steve Wilton of Masterton as a Fellow of the NZ Institute of Forestry was also recorded. The election to this special membership status is granted by a vote of members and recognises the eminence of Steve Wilton in the profession of forestry.

The contribution of Trish Fordyce of Auckland to the New Zealand forestry sector and her long service to the sector in the areas of environmental and land use regulation, and the application of the Resource Management to forestry and wood processing was recognised, by her election as an Honorary Member of the NZ Institute of Forestry.

“The Institute believes it is very important to celebrate the significant contributions of members and non-members alike and Steve and Trish are most deserving recipients of these honours”, Dr Evison noted.


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