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Electric vehicle charging sessions sky rocket

Vector has seen a 190 per cent increase in electric vehicle (EV) charging sessions in the 12 months to June, a figure that supports Ministry of Transport data that shows EV uptake in New Zealand is sky rocketing.

Vector counted 66,000 charging sessions across its 18-strong rapid EV charging network in this 12-month period, compared to 22,700 sessions the previous year.

In total, there were 590 megawatt hours of electricity consumed during the charging sessions, which is enough energy to drive your average EV to France and back 87 times (at the speed limit, and as the crow flies).

ends

Collectively these 66,000 charging sessions have saved 639,000 kilograms of CO2e emissions from entering the atmosphere.

“There is no denying EVs are going to play a crucial role in achieving a clean green future for New Zealand,” said Vector Chief Executive Simon Mackenzie.

“Some experts believe the total cost of ownership of EV’s is already below that of petrol cars, so these trends are only heading in one direction.

“While this is great news for the environment, there is still a lot of work to do as an industry to ensure New Zealand’s electricity infrastructure can handle the surge in demand for clean electricity to power our transport industry.

“Vector is working to understanding exactly how the rise of EVs will impact the way electricity is distributed across our networks, so supply can always meet demand,” Simon said.

As part of this research in EV trends, Vector recently begun trailing a two-way electric vehicle charger that transforms EVs into mobile power sources. When connected to a V2G charger at home or work, the charge from an EV is used as a power boost for the building.

Simon adds, “This type of V2G technology has the potential to smooth out the growing impact EVs will have on our peak electricity demand, while also giving people energy reserves on demand, greater flexibility and an alternative to using energy from the grid.


“When you add smart solar and battery systems into the mix, you’ve got a truly future-ready energy ecosystem that will diversify energy distribution, lower carbon emissions and reduce consumer costs.”

ENDS

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