Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

MPI releases imported apple and stonefruit plants

Media Release - 25 September 2018

MPI releases 20,000 imported apple plants and 400 stonefruit plants

Around 20,000 apple plants and 400 stonefruit plants imported from a US testing facility have been released from all restrictions, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

The plant material was seized following an MPI audit in March which found a number of significant failures at Clean Plant Centre Northwest. MPI had little confidence in the testing carried out. An investigation by US authorities confirmed MPI’s findings.

MPI has now completed additional testing for pests and diseases of concern on the affected apple plants as well as a small number of stonefruit plants, says director of plant and pathways, Pete Thomson.

“As all the test results were negative and we are satisfied the biosecurity risk has been minimised, we’re pleased to be in the position to release these plants back to their owners.

“Throughout this process our decisions have been based on protecting New Zealand. Some of the diseases, if present, could impact significantly on our wider horticultural industry.”

Nearly 20,000 stonefruit plants require further testing over spring and summer, when diseases of concern will be most evident if they are present.

MPI has worked with affected nurseries, importers and growers to develop detailed individual testing plans for each owner. These plans take into account testing that has already been done in New Zealand.

Almost 48,000 affected apple and stonefruit plants and small trees were secured at 50 sites in Hawke’s Bay, Waikato, Nelson and central Otago. In total, 32 nurseries, importers and growers were affected.

Just over 1,000 apple plants have been voluntarily destroyed by 12 owners. Twenty owners opted to destroy over 6,000 stonefruit plants.

“MPI remains open to receiving requests for payment for direct and verifiable losses incurred as a result of destroyed or contained plant material,” says Mr Thomson.

“We’ve written to all affected owners on this, and we are offering one-on-one meetings to talk through the process.”

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Retail: International Websites To Pay GST

New rules would be aimed at imported goods valued at or below $1,000. Customs would retain responsibility for collecting GST on imported parcels valued more than $1,000. More>>

ALSO:

High-Level Advice: PM’s Business Advisory Council Membership Announced

The Prime Minister’s Business Advisory Council brings together a mix of experts, six women and seven men with small to large business experience, from across New Zealand, to provide advice. More>>

ALSO:

Improving: Report Shows New Zealand Air Quality 'Good'

Our air 2018, produced by the Ministry for the Environment and Stats NZ, shows that while some previously known issues persist, progress has been made and levels of some pollutants are declining. More>>

ALSO:

Greenpeace: Govt Extends OMV Exploration Permit

The Government has just granted oil giant OMV a two-year extension to drill in the Great South Basin, despite issuing a ban on new oil and gas exploration permits in April. More>>

ALSO:

Collective Bargaining For Contractors: Working Group's Model For Screen Sector

A recommended model to allow collective bargaining for contractors in the screen sector has today been unveiled by the Government-convened Film Industry Working Group. More>>

ALSO:

Kauri Dieback: DOC Closing Tracks To Protect Trees

The Department of Conservation will close 21 tracks across kauri land to help prevent the spread of kauri dieback. An additional 10 tracks will also be partially closed and the open sections upgraded... More>>