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TaleFlick Launches in New Zealand

NEW ZEALAND’S BEST UNTOLD STORIES NOW DISCOVERABLE BY HOLLYWOOD

From Taihepe to Taieri, New Zealand writers and storytellers can now bridge the geographic divide to Hollywood, thanks to TaleFlick - a digital story content platform that connects content creators with film studios and producers.

Until now, writers, publishers and storytellers have faced multiple barriers to getting their stories noticed by film studios or producers on the other side of the world. Utilising digital tools, Los Angeles based TaleFlick removes many of the traditional barriers to let original stories shine, and most importantly, be found.

Published and unpublished writers upload their novel to TaleFlick; a digital searchable story library. Film and small screen producers and studios can then search the library and ideally a connection can be made to optioning and eventual screen production.

TaleFlick co-founder and film producer Uri Singer says that TaleFlick embodies the ultimate democratisation of the arts; doing away with the traditional barriers writers face in getting their stories picked up by Hollywood.

“I know from my time working with both storytellers and producers, just how hard it is as a writer to get your story on the radar of a producer. Even if you’re a published writer living in Hollywood, it’s still phenomenally hard without connections, networks, fame and a lot of luck, to get your story picked up. If you’re unpublished and living in Taupo, you may have had the greatest story ever told sitting on your hard drive, but no way to bridge the gap to Hollywood.”



TaleFlick co-founder and COO George Berry who has worked at Apple and Netflix, says that New Zealand’s strong novel-to-film tradition is only ‘scratching the surface’ of the stories still to be unearthed.

“New Zealand stories have increasingly been taking centre stage globally and there is enormous appetite for original, engaging content. In every cinema there right now there will be at least one movie that started life as book. What we’re hearing more and more from small screen producers is their increasing demand for content that can be serialised; think Big Little Lies, Handmaid’s Tale, House of Cards - all of which started life as a book.”

Writers and publishers can pay an annual subscription to upload their books to the TaleFlick platform where a mix of machine learning algorithms and human curation publishes the story to the platform, making it searchable directly by producers and studios.

Launched in Hollywood three months ago, TaleFlick has already had one of its UK based writer’s works picked up by a studio and optioning talks are now underway.

TaleFlick aims to become the most reliable source of story supply to a growing entertainment industry constantly demanding original, engaging content.

For more information please visit: www.taleflick.com.


ENDS


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