Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Auckland port joins the hydrogen bandwagon


By Pattrick Smellie

Dec. 3 (BusinessDesk) – Ports of Auckland has joined a growing number of hydrogen production experiments as the fuel gains attention of industries seeking to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

Chief executive Tony Gibson announced a pilot project to build a hydrogen production and fuelling facility for use by vehicles at the port, including tugs and container straddle-carriers.

The port has contracted with global energy consultancy Arup for the project, which was foreshadowed at the Asia-Pacific Energy Leaders Summit in Wellington last month.

Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and KiwiRail are also partnering in the trial as more firms back hydrogen as a more likely option than electricity to replace fossil fuels for heavy transport tasks like trucking, rail and shipping. Batteries currently are too heavy and don't have the range to make them useful for long-haul and heavy transport.

Hiringa Energy and New Plymouth trucking firm TIL Logistics are to receive Provincial Growth Fund assistance for a similar trucking fuel trial while Japan's Obayashi Corp and Mokai field owner Tuaropaki last week turned earth on a project near Taupo to use geothermal energy to produce hydrogen.

A far larger proposal, known as Pouakai, is being promoted for the Taranaki region, based on a new zero emissions technology that would use natural gas to produce electricity, hydrogen and ammonia-urea for fertiliser.



The Auckland hydrogen plant will produce hydrogen using electrolysis to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, with the hydrogen stored for use and oxygen released to the atmosphere.

Hydrogen “could help Auckland and New Zealand towards energy self-sufficiency and our emission reduction goals,” said Gibson. "Trucks, trains and ferries could also run on hydrogen."

Applications for a resource consent are expected to be lodged early next year, with the facility operational by the end of 2019.

(BusinessDesk)

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Tax Bill Passes, Drops: “An End To Unnecessary Secondary Tax”

“The changes mean Inland Revenue will more closely monitor the tax paid by wage and salary earners through the year. If it appears the worker is being over taxed, Inland Revenue will suggest a more suitable PAYE tax code tailored to that worker.” More>>

ALSO:

Ethiopian Airline Crash: Boeing 737 Max Aircraft Operations Temporarily Suspended

New Zealand’s Civil Aviation Authority has suspended the operation of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft to or from New Zealand. Currently this affects only one operator, Fiji Airways. There are no other airlines that fly this aircraft type to New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Sorting Out DNA: Crime-Busting Software Wins Top Science Prize

Software developed in New Zealand that has contributed to identifying suspects in tens of thousands of criminal cases around the world has won the 2018 Prime Minister’s $500,000 Science Prize. More>>

ALSO:

In The High Court: IRD Wins Tax Avoidance Case

Inland Revenue has won a High Court case against Eric Watson’s Cullen Group over a nearly $52 million tax debt. More>>

ALSO:

Insurers Withdraw From Market: Plea For EQC Rethink

A consumer watchdog wants the government to rethink the Earthquake Commission (EQC) as more people are pushed out of getting property and contents insurance. More>>

ALSO:

Women's Day: New Zealand Rated Third Best In OECD For Working Women

New Zealand has been rated among the top countries in the world for working women. The Women in Work Index rated New Zealand third in the OECD and it was the only country outside Europe to make the top 10. More>>

ALSO: