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Time to recall defective Lime scooters

Lime e-scooters have serious safety defects and should be recalled immediately, says the car review website dogandlemon.com.

Editor Clive Matthew Wilson, who is an outspoken road safety campaigner, says:

“There have been multiple accidents involving Lime e-scooters. In the latest incidents, Lime scooters have suddenly locked up while being ridden. Lime claims that it is dealing with the issue; the facts suggest otherwise. Clearly, it is time for the government to step in and force a compulsory recall.”

“The Minister of Commerce and Consumer Affairs has the power to force a recall on any defective consumer product. Clearly, the Minister needs to act now, before more serious injuries and deaths occur.”

Matthew-Wilson says the chaotic introduction of e-scooters is a classic example of poor urban planning.

“I’m not against e-scooters. I’m against the way that the promoters of these scooters were allowed to effectively dump their products onto the market without any real planning or supervision. The riders of these scooters and the taxpayer both end up paying the price.”

Matthew-Wilson believes e-scooters should be banned until the promoters come up with a convincing plan for their use.

“Our cities need to be redesigned to cope with e-scooters, at the promoters’ expense. A delay in introducing e-scooters isn’t going to kill anyone. However, leaving these scooters operating in their current manner is already killing and maiming people”.

Matthew-Wilson adds:

“Motorbikes must meet a high standard before they’re allowed on our roads. There are strict controls over how and where motorbikes can be driven. That’s because motorbikes can easily kill innocent people. Why should e-scooters be treated any differently?”




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