Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Water tax decision and environmental improvements

Thursday 18 April 2019
Media Release

Water tax decision allows environmental improvements to be targeted

IrrigationNZ says the government’s decision not to introduce a water tax in the near future is good news for all New Zealanders.


“The Tax Working Group proposed a nationwide tax on all water use including for hydroelectricity, household, business and agricultural use. That would have resulted in higher power and food prices for households and businesses and higher rates bills for everyone,” says IrrigationNZ Chief Executive Elizabeth Soal.


“Farmers and growers have been proactively taking steps to reduce environmental impacts at considerable cost and this is already having an impact on water quality with many water quality indicators showing improvement in the most recent LAWA dataset including nitrogen,” adds Ms Soal.

“All of us want to see improved water quality,” says Ms Soal. “Both the government and regional councils have signalled there will be further regulation to improve water quality and these changes have further financial costs for irrigators,” says Ms Soal.

“Introducing new taxes would have made it difficult for farmers to continue to invest significantly in improving environmental outcomes which are a priority and which we all want to see,” she adds.


Ms Soal says that there are already a number existing incentives that encourage efficient water use including electricity costs and regulatory nutrient limit rules which require farmers to only use water when needed.


Farmers and irrigation schemes have invested $1.7 billion to modernise their systems since 2011, resulting in significant improvements in water efficiency.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO:

Oil Scare: Trump Authorises Use Of Emergency Crude Stockpile

The New Zealand dollar fell against the US dollar after President Donald Trump authorised the use of the country's emergency crude stockpile after the weekend attack on Saudi Arabia’s major oil facilities. More>>

ALSO:

Pre-Post-Brexit Deal Talks: UK Trade Minister Visits Wellington

New Zealand should get a better deal for exports of sheepmeat, beef and dairy products into the United Kingdom after Brexit, the British Minister of State for Trade, Liz Truss, said in Wellington today. More>>

ALSO:

Not-Very Well: Tamarind Halts Tui Drilling; OMV Assesses Options

Tamarind Resources has halted drilling at its Tui oil field off the Taranaki coast after the first of the three planned wells came up dry. Managing director Ian Angell says that despite the “unexpected” result from the first well, the firm believes the other two prospects are worth pursuing. More>>

ALSO:

Seeking 'Clarity': Crown To Appeal Southern Response Decision, Offers Costs

“It is our intention that the clarity that will come from the outcome of these proceedings will enable the Crown to work with Southern Response to provide a soundly based proactive solution to those people that are affected.” More>>