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LandWISE at Techweek19

23 April 2019


For two days in May, LandWISE 2019: Rethinking Best Practice will bring together lead researchers, tech providers and farmers in Havelock North for a 17th year, to discuss how old practices can be replaced with new thinking and technology.


Farming has complex systems and change can be difficult to manage. Critical topics covered include reducing nitrate losses that impact water quality in our streams by incorporating new technologies and practices, new technologies to remove pollutants from surface water, new technologies for weed control and generally, growing more food with less impact and better profit.


LandWISE’s Dan Bloomer says that the event is a valuable opportunity for people across the sector to gather to talk about real world problems and learn about new tech.


“The conference is all about sustainable land management and we’re really excited to have speakers from two American universities, as well as hearing from farmers and people across the agriculture world from viticulture to honey to vegetables.”


There’s also the chance to check out the latest equipment and watch demonstrations, it’s a great couple of days for not just listening, but engaging with the latest ideas and technology.”


LandWISE was awarded four significant new projects that started in 2018. They cover enhanced GPS, precision drainage for orchards, nitrates in fresh vegetable production and herbicide resistance management. They’ll be among the topics discussed at LandWISE 2019.

LandWISE 2019: Rethinking Best Practice

22-23 May, 8:30am-5pm
Havelock North Function Centre


Tickets for LandWISE 2019 are on sale now at techweek.co.nz.


ends

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