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Forestry investors log in to substantial pine plantation


A large maturing pine forest on Auckland City’s metropolitan boundary which is ready for harvesting in the near future has been placed on the market for sale.

The 135-hectare block is located at the lower foothills of the Hunua Ranges some 50 kilometres south-east of Auckland City. Owned by the current proprietor for past 50 years, the forest was planted between 1993 and 2000 in a mix of lusitanica and radiata pine varieties.

The freehold land and forest at Stevens Road are now being marketed for sale by tender through Bayleys Counties, with tenders closing at 2pm on June 6. The forestry plantation encompasses six individual land titles which are all zoned rural under Auckland Council’s land usage plan.

Bayleys Counties salesperson Peter Sullivan said there were multiple ways of valuing the asset – depending on its future use once the logs were extracted in the near future. Trees are grown on some 93.8 hectares of the Hunua property.

“These mid’ to long-term options range from harvesting the existing plantation and replanting more pine forest, through to harvesting the logs and clearing the site in preparation for subdivision into lifestyle residential properties, or taking the subdivision option right through to selling off individual sections with utilities and roading infrastructure laid in place,” he said.

“The lifestyle subdivision option is underpinned by the property being held in six individual land titles, along with the site’s proximity to Hunua village.”

Mr Sullivan said the forest was serviced by excellent existing internal roading and tracks.

“Any vehicular access improvements for log harvesting and removal could of course be undertaken with one eye on the site’s future use – whether to be retained in forestry planting, or converted into a residential enclave,” he said.

Throughout their lifespan, all trees within the block have been regularly commercially pruned and thinned to ensure the best cropping returns and tonnage when they are felled. Nearing their peak maturity, Mr Sullivan said the trees did not require any further tending. Radiata pine reaches its optimum harvest range at 25-years, while lusitanica pine reaches its optimum harvest range after 35-years.

Mr Sullivan said a comprehensive log harvesting plan had been compiled for the forestry block – taking into account all felling and transportation expenses – and the report could be made available to potential buyers for review.

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