Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Launch of infrastructure pipeline welcomed by industry


“A new infrastructure pipeline tool launched today is a positive step towards lifting the productivity of the infrastructure sector,” says Infrastructure NZ CEO Stephen Selwood.

The NZ Treasury launched the first iteration of a national infrastructure project pipeline, detailing 174 projects with an estimated value of $6.1 billion. It can be accessed here.

The prototype, developed by the Treasury’s Infrastructure Transactions Unit, presents data from five capital-intensive agencies – the Department of Corrections, the New Zealand Transport Agency, the ministries of Education and Health and the New Zealand Defence Force.

It allows users to filter data using a range of variables, including sector, agency, region, start date and value range, and provides a CSV file to download for further data interrogation.

The prototype is expected to be followed by several further iterations in the lead-up to the establishment of the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga, later this year.

Over time, the aim is that all central government agencies, as well as local government agencies and many private sector projects will be included in the pipeline.

“The new tool is extremely welcome,” Selwood says.

“Certainty of pipeline underpins investment in training, capital equipment and capacity building across the sector, as well as being key to attracting domestic and foreign direct investment.

“New Zealand has had a traditional construction sector malaise due to boom-bust cycles. This promotes the short-term subcontracting model where firms hold costs to the minimum when the market is slow, under-invest in training, technology and equipment and rely on the subcontracting sector to bring in additional skills when needed.

"A detailed schedule of what projects will be released, their value and sequencing to market is at the heart of the information that is required to attract investment and deliver the productivity improvements needed to meet infrastructure demand.

“Consolidating information on the five capital-intensive agencies in one place is a useful start. Data on total volumes, project dollar value, procurement agency and region are all of interest.

"However, functionality which enables suppliers to aggregate projects and project values by location, sector and sequencing will be desirable in future iterations.

“Ideally, the pipeline will identify changes over time in investment levels and will include anticipated procurement methodology – infrastructure investors also need an indication of future opportunities.

“Most of all, the credibility of the pipeline needs to be backed by a serious commitment to projects actually being funded and brought to market within the stated timeline.

“While some changes in priorities will be expected, for industry to have confidence to invest, there must be confidence in authorities to deliver," Selwood said.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Up 0.5% In June Quarter: Services Lead GDP Growth

“Service industries, which represent about two-thirds of the economy, were the main contributor to GDP growth in the quarter, rising 0.7 percent off the back of a subdued result in the March 2019 quarter.” More>>

ALSO:

Pickers: Letter To Immigration Minister From Early Harvesting Growers

A group of horticultural growers are frustrated by many months of inaction by the Minister who has failed to announce additional immigrant workers from overseas will be allowed into New Zealand to assist with harvesting early stage crops such as asparagus and strawberries. More>>

ALSO:

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO: