Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Review of goods clearance fees

Acting Comptroller of Customs Bill Perry says a review of Customs fees for clearing imported and exported goods is long overdue.

“Customs last reviewed its fees in 2006 and since then, the type and volume of goods crossing the border has changed significantly.”

“Customs is responding to increased risks and new ways of smuggling illicit drugs in goods, and the proposed fees support its capability to protect New Zealanders from those risks.”

“The considerable growth in the volume of lower value goods being imported and exported by air, means that Customs needs to take a closer look at how it recovers the costs incurred clearing goods.”

“A review of Customs goods clearance fees has highlighted the need to update charges to reflect where the costs of identifying risks in sea and air cargo now lie.”

“There is now greater transparency around how Customs costs its activities and applies its charges.”

“The proposed fees reflect the actual costs Customs incurs clearing goods, and costs are now shared more fairly - some fees will increase and some will reduce. On this basis, most export charges will reduce.”

“The key principle underpinning the review is equity - those who generate need for and/or benefit from Customs activities should pay for them.”

Public consultation will run until 5pm 30 August 2019. Detailed information about the costs of Customs goods clearance activities and proposed changes to fees can be found by visiting www.customs.govt.nz/fees-review.

“I urge affected importers, exporters and businesses to engage in the consultation process to enable Customs to fully understand the implications of its proposals and develop the right charges,” Bill Perry says.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO:

Oil Scare: Trump Authorises Use Of Emergency Crude Stockpile

The New Zealand dollar fell against the US dollar after President Donald Trump authorised the use of the country's emergency crude stockpile after the weekend attack on Saudi Arabia’s major oil facilities. More>>

ALSO: