Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Countdown to the 2019 Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year

Following six regional finals throughout June and July, the countdown is on to the 2019 Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year National Final. Six finalists from around the country will take part in this prestigious competition on Monday 26th August at Te Awa winery in Hawke’s Bay.

The national finalists are: Jake Dromgool from The Landing, Northland; Nick Putt from Villa Maria, Hawke’s Bay; George Bunnett from Craggy Range, Wairarapa; Ben Richards from Indevin, Marlborough; Zoe Marychurch from Pegasus Bay, Waipara & Simon Gourley from Domaine Thomson, Central Otago

Throughout the day they will be tested on everything a Viticulturist needs to know to run a successful vineyard. Being the national final there will of course be a few curve balls thrown in as well as the popular BioStart Hortisports race at lunchtime when the contestants go head to head amongst the vines.

They have already handed in their AGMARDT project as part of the build up to the national final which involved writing a biosecurity plan for their vineyard.

Their final challenge will be to deliver a speech on Wednesday at Bragato, the New Zealand wine industry’s national annual conference. The winner will then be announced at the Bragato conference dinner on Thursday 29th August 2019.

Winning the coveted title of Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year is a goal many young vits set themselves. It’s a tough competition, so to win is no easy feat and the rewards are high. Taking out the title really spurs on the winner’s career. They also win an amazing prize package of a Hyundai Kona for a year, an Ecotrellis Travel Grant, Bahco golden secateurs, a leadership week and cash. There is also a cash prize for the best AGMARDT project and presentation.

The winner will also go on to represent the wine industry in the Young Horticulturist of the Year Competition in November.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO:

Oil Scare: Trump Authorises Use Of Emergency Crude Stockpile

The New Zealand dollar fell against the US dollar after President Donald Trump authorised the use of the country's emergency crude stockpile after the weekend attack on Saudi Arabia’s major oil facilities. More>>

ALSO: