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Critical Technology Concerns In Csc Survey.

MEDIACOM-RELEASE-COMPUTER-SCIENCES-CORP

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND TECHNOLOGY EXECUTIVES CITE CRITICAL TECHNOLOGY CONCERNS IN CSC SURVEY.

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Nov. 29 RNewswire-AsiaNet/ -- Two information technology issues, organizing and utilizing data and aligning information systems and corporate goals, were identified by Australia and New Zealand's chief information officers as uppermost on their agendas this year, according to a survey by Computer Sciences Corporation (NYSE: CSC).

According to the company's 12th Annual Critical Issues of Information Systems (I/S) Management Study, organizing and utilizing data is the top technology issue for 70 percent of Australian and New Zealand executives, followed closely by aligning I/S and corporate goals at 69 percent.

"There's a high degree of similarity between Australian and New Zealand executives and their colleagues from Europe and North America," noted George Bell, CEO and managing director of CSC's operations in Australia and New Zealand. "With increasing volumes of information now available, how to handle the information is uppermost on the information technology (I/T) planning agenda."

Other significant I/T issues are the increased focus on connecting to customers, suppliers and partners electronically, which 65 percent of the executives rated as a priority and developing an electronic business strategy, which 63 percent of the executives identified as critical. These issues placed in third and fourth on the list of the top I/S issues this year, compared to eighth and 20th position in 1998.

"These results reflect a growing trend toward the use of e-commerce as a legitimate, integrated business tool that will prove to be critical to future success," said Bell.

In fact, 55 percent of all respondents were looking to make a significant investment of time and/or resources in electronic commerce, 53 percent in networks, 49 percent in enterprise architectures and 51 percent in security. An even greater number, about 64 percent, have undertaken systems development work with the objective of improving customer service levels.

"There appears to be a strong correlation between this focus on customer service and the development of a digital strategy," said Bell, noting that more than 60 percent of executives stated that their primary objective in pursuing e-business was to strengthen relationships with customers and suppliers.

In fact, for the first time, Internet technologies showed up on the survey as an important issue for executives. Just over 92 percent of Australia and New Zealand's I/T executives confirmed their organizations already have Web sites. This gives the region the most Web presence of any region other than North America, where 95 percent of executives reported having Web sites, and makes it significantly more connected than Asia-Pacific, where only 69 percent had sites.

"The challenge for the new millennium lies with quantifying the return on I/T investments and, particularly, as it applies to investment in e-business initiatives," noted Bell. "This region seems to have more of an uphill battle in this regard than other regions, if its anticipated budget increases are any guide." I/T executives from Australia and New Zealand cited a budget increase of 4.6 percent, the lowest of any region surveyed.

CSC has queried I/T executives on critical technology issues since 1988. The 803 respondents to this year's survey include chief information officers and vice presidents and directors of technology departments representing organizations in more than 18 different areas such as financial services, healthcare, consumer goods, aerospace and government. Of the total respondents, 35 percent represented North American organizations, 20 percent were from European companies, 14 percent were from Australia and New Zealand organizations and 31 percent represented companies from Asia.

Computer Sciences Corporation helps clients in industry and government use information technology to achieve strategic and operational objectives. With 54,000 employees in more than 700 offices worldwide, the company tailors solutions from a broad suite of integrated service and technology offerings, including e-business strategies and technologies; management and I/T consulting; systems development and integration; application software; and I/T and business process outsourcing.

Since its formation in 1959, CSC has been known for its flexibility in its relationships with clients. Through numerous agreements with hardware and software technology firms, the company is able to identify and manage solutions specifically tailored to each client's needs. CSC had revenues of $8.2 billion for the twelve months ended October 1, 1999. Its headquarters are in El Segundo, California. For more information about the company or the Critical Issues Survey, visit the company's web site at www.csc.com. Australia/New Zealand's Top 10 Information Technology Issues as ranked in Computer Sciences Corporation's 1999 Critical Issues of Information Systems Management

1. Organizing and Utilizing Data

2. Aligning I/S and Corporate Goals

3. Connecting to Customers, Suppliers, and/or Partners

Electronically

4. Developing an Electronic Business Strategy

5. Integrating Systems

6. Capitalizing on Advances in I/T

7. Cutting I/S Costs

8. Updating Obsolete Systems

9. Instituting Cross-Functional Information Systems

10.Changing Technology Platforms

ENDS...

MEDIA RELEASE FROM COMPUTER SCIENCES CORPORATION

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