Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Creative NZ: Regional Strengths Strategy

REGIONAL STRENGTHS STRATEGY


Regional Strengths is a new strategy building on current ways that Creative New Zealand supports arts in the regions.

In the first year of the three-year strategy, $510,000 will be committed to support partnerships between local authorities and communities that provide larger, regional arts projects spanning district boundaries: eg touring projects, arts festivals, hui, wananga and arts marketing initiatives.

Creative New Zealand supports many initiatives and projects in the regions. The primary way it supports arts in communities is through its Creative Communities Scheme, a partnership with all 74 local authorities in New Zealand. In 1998/1999, the Scheme allocated grants totalling $2.56 million to 2450 local arts projects.

The Regional Strengths pilot schemes will build on the Creative Communities Scheme by expanding access and participation in the arts across district boundaries.

A 1998 review of the Creative Communities Scheme, plus consultation with communities, revealed a gap in this area.

“Currently, there is a gap in the funding of regional projects … There could be a separate mechanism for regional funding … Different funding rounds [eg criteria, committees, closing dates] contribute to the difficulties experienced by local authorities that might otherwise be able to co-operate in funding regional applications or applying to national sources.”

In 1999, Creative New Zealand established the Creative Places Award to recognise and celebrate the key role that local authorities play in the arts. The 2000 Award will be announced at the Local Government New Zealand Conference in Christchurch in July.

Community and regional arts projects are also supported through Creative New Zealand’s project funding rounds. Recent examples include the Otago Festival of the Arts and its Fringe Festival, the New Zealand Society of Potters touring potters’ workshops, singer/songwriter Mahinarangi Tocker’s creative workshops with youth and young Maori, and the Nelson Wearable Art Awards.

A number of local authorities have signalled their interest in working co-operatively and Creative New Zealand will be identifying regions that are already working in this way. Several regions will be approached to form the strategy’s initial pilots.

One of the aims of these initial pilots is to establish and implement a framework for Regional Strengths, enhancing Creative New Zealand’s vital relationship with local government and communities.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis Review: Reclaiming The N-Word - Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman

Black resistance to institutional racism in the US has a long, tangled, and traumatic intellectual history. Although we may have assumed much too easily that white supremacists like David Duke had become marginalised as a political force, in reality they never really disappeared ... More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Minstrel in The Gallery - Sam Hunt's Selected Poems

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Sam Hunt's poetry is its quality of urgent authenticity. Encountering this latest compilation, the reader is immediately struck by its easy accessibility, tonal sincerity, and lack of linguistic pretension ... More>>

A Matter Of Fact: Truth In A Post-Truth World

How do we convincingly explain the difference between good information and misinformation? And conversely, how do we challenge our own pre-conceived notions of what we believe to be true? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: The Road To Unfreedom

Valerie Morse: Yale professor of history Tim Snyder publishes a stunning account of the mechanisms of contemporary Russian power in US and European politics. In telling this story he presents both startling alarms for our own society and some mechanisms of resistance. More>>

ALSO:

Doing Our Bit: An Insider's Account Of New Zealand Political Campaigning

In 2013, Murdoch Stephens began a campaign to double New Zealand’s refugee quota. Over the next five years he built the campaign into a mainstream national movement – one that contributed to the first growth in New Zealand’s refugee quota in thirty years. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland