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Kids Are Being Creative With Computers

School students all around New Zealand are creating works of art on computers, and their talent is showcased in the annual Computer Graphics Competition. The results of this year's competition have just been announced, and the judges say the work is becoming incredibly sophisticated, with some students handling software like professionals. From animals to abstracts, Maori designs to space age art - a wonderful range of artwork was entered in the year 2000.

Winning students will have their work published on the cover of Computers in New Zealand Schools and receive $100 each. There's something in it for the winning students' schools, too - they receive an Iomega Zip drive and disks. The competition began in 1997 and is run by the magazine Computers in New Zealand Schools, published by the University of Otago Press. This annual event recognises and encourages the creativity and computer skills of young people, as well as providing teachers with an opportunity for class activities based around computer graphics. Now that it is well established, the organisers plan to introduce new categories in 2001, including Best School.

This year's winners are:

5-9 years Tim Bowden (9), Ramanui School, Hawera, winner Lani Vaeila (8), Sutton Park School, Auckland, runner-up Nicholas Hoole (8), Rere School, Gisborne, runner-up

10-12 years Charlotte Whiteacre (10), St Cuthbert's College, Auckland, winner Rawiri Te Awhe (12), Otumoetai Intermediate School, Tauranga, runner-up Nathan Smith (11), Otumoetai Intermediate School, Tauranga, runner-up

13-18 years Julie Kim (18), Westlake Girls' High School, Auckland, winner Jay Nielson (17), Havelock North High School, Hawkes Bay, runner-up Leigh Becker (16), Christ's College, Christchurch, runner-up

For more information, contact Philippa Jamieson at the address below, or email philippa.jamieson@stonebow.otago.ac.nz

Philippa Jamieson, Publicist University of Otago Press, PO Box 56, Dunedin tel (03) 479 9094, fax (03) 479 8385

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