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Parihaka: The Art Of Passive Resistance

PARIHAKA
THE ART OF PASSIVE RESISTANCE
City Gallery Wellington
26 August - 19 January 2001
www.parihaka.city-gallery.org.nz

August / September Public Programme events
(Admission free)

Saturday 26 August, 2pm, City Cinema, City Gallery
Parihaka - Introductory talk
This lecture will open with a körero by Mahara Okeroa - MP for Te Tai
Tonga/Parihaka Pä Trustee, and Parihaka spokesperson Te Miringa Hohaia.
Lecturer Mereana Hond will speak on behalf of the women of Parihaka and will introduce Dr Hazel Riseborough, author of Days of Darkness: Taranaki 1878-1884 and Parihaka and the Historians.

Parihaka in Focus

The Parihaka story goes back over 130 years. For Mäori, especially Taranaki Mäori, it has always been in sharp focus, but for many people the picture has been blurred. A clearer understanding of the story will provide a useful background from which to view the art and poetry of the exhibition.

Dr Hazel Riseborough
Sunday 27 August, 1pm
Words to the Mountain
Leading New Zealand poets read newly commissioned works and others relating to Parihaka, land and identity - JC Sturm, Elizabeth Smither, Roma Potiki, Rore Hapipi, Robert Sullivan, Ian Wedde, Chris Orsman, Alistair Te Ariki Campbell, Dinah Hawken, Apirana Taylor.
* gold coin donation

Sunday 3 September, 3pm
Ask That Mountain
Author of the ground-breaking book Ask That Mountain (1975), Dick Scott became aware of Parihaka in the early 1950s. His first book, The Parihaka Story, appeared in 1954. Dick Scott will talk with Te Miringa Hohaia and Gregory O'Brien about how he became involved with the people of the pä and their history. The evolution of both publications, their impact and the ongoing significance of the Parihaka story will be discussed.

Sunday 10 September, 3pm
Parihaka - Director's Tour
Gallery Director Paula Savage takes you on a personal tour of the exhibition. She shares something of the exhibition history and the unique journey that turned a vision into a reality. This art confronts the issues of Mäori/Päkehä relations. By confronting and acknowledging the damage done, art has the power to heal the wounds and begin the journey toward reconciliation. - Paula Savage

Sunday 17 September, 1pm
Taranaki Cries and Whispers
Join Greg O'Brien for a floortalk exploring the voices in Ralph Hotere's 'Te Whiti' series. Texts from ancient times until the present, in Mäori and English, are the basis for these dark, atmospheric works. In this series of 'painted utterances', words are set adrift in the natural world or inscribed on the night sky. The talk will also examine the pivotal works in relation to Hotere's oeuvre.

Sunday 17 September, 3pm
A Spiritual Relationship
Tohu and Te Whiti were both immersed in their own culture's wairua and fully conversant with Christian scriptures. Professor of Religious Studies at Victoria, Paul Morris considers the religious response of Tohu and Te Whiti, comparing this with first nations' spirituality in other cultures.

Sunday 24 September, 3pm
Ko Taranaki Maunga anake kei te Möhio - Taranaki Saw It All
As curator of the 1973 exhibition Taranaki Saw It All, James Mack stepped into a cross-cultural role that few had undertaken in the gallery environment of the time. In a retrospective excursion, he discusses his involvement and pays tribute to the people of Taranaki and the artists who made the exhibition possible.
I
n 1972, as newly appointed Exhibitions Officer at the recently amalgamated Waikato Museum & Art Gallery, I was told to do an exhibition on Te Whiti o Rongomai and Parihaka. I had no idea who he was, neither did I then realise the research I was about to embark on would change my life.

Michael Hirschfeld Gallery (Admission free)

Practising Beauty
28 July - 27 August 2000
Presenting work by four Wellington artists - Catherine Bagnall, Kathy Barry, Emma Febvre-Richards and Maddie Leach - which explores the practices of creating and viewing beauty.

Anahera Te Pono
1 September - 1 October 2000
Works in stone by Hariata Ropata Tangahoe.

All media inquiries to:
Anne Irving
PUBLICIST
T: 04 801 3959 / F: 04 801 3096
E: anne.irving@wcc.govt.nz

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