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History exhibitions

Hi

I thought you might be interested in a clutch of online exhibitions we have launched recently. Here is some info about them:

NZhistory.net, the New Zealand history website run by the History Group of the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, has just put up a series of new exhibitions.

'Living in the Twentieth Century: New Zealand History in Photographs, 1900-1980' is a selection of captioned images of everyday life, derived from a recently published book of the same name. Photographs cover the topics of work, play, clothing, food, communications, shelter, and major events of the century.

Visit this exhibition at http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/Gallery/living/index.htm

'We Never Had it So Good?: Thematic Essays from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, volume 5, 1941-1960' is a series of illustrated essays on postwar New Zealand. Essays feature related sound files and photographs and include a selection of biographies from the most recent volume of the DNZB.

The three sections so far are 'The Other Side of the Story: Protest and Dissent in the 1940s and 1950s' (which covers the 1951 waterfront dispute, the notorious Holmes 'Satchel Snatch' of 1948, and the Nelson women's railway protest of 1955); 'Becoming New Zealanders: Population, immigration and citizenship, 1940-1960' looks at immigration policy and restrictions, assisted immigration, and the process of becoming a NZ citizen; 'Listen...it's a goal! Sport in New Zealand 1940-1960' includes 1950s' rugby, women's sport, professionalism, and athletics.

Visit this series at http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/dnzb_exhibs/index.htm

'The Daily Grind: Wellington Cafe Culture, 1920-2000' is hosted by nzhistory.net, and produced by the Masters in Public History students from Victoria University of Wellington. The exhibition includes the rise of cafes in 1950s' Wellington, looks at the role of migrants in establishing these, examines the changing design of cafes - and all to the sound of hissing espresso machines.

Visit this exhibition at http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/mph/cafe/index.htm

Regards Jamie Mackay Web Editor Ministry for Culture and Heritage ph 64 - (04) 471 4022 email: jamie.mackay@mch.govt.nz http://www.mch.govt.nz http://www.nzhistory.net.nz


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