Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Whanau

National Radio
60-part series beginning Monday 23 July
Weekdays 11.04 am & 8.55pm


Underlining its commitment to Te Wiki o te Reo Mäori, Mäori Language Week, National Radio is launching its first ever Maori language drama series next Monday.

The sitcom, called Whanau is made up of sixty, two minute episodes and follows the fortunes of the Hitoki whanau. It’s a universal family saga, but also firmly grounded in Te Ao Mäori, the Mäori world.

It will feature on the Kim Hill programme weekday mornings just after the eleven o’clock news.

National Radio’s Programme Development Manager, Elizabeth Alley says Whanau is good, lively radio with a strong storyline and universal appeal. “Hearing the Maori language used really well is a very enriching experience, you can be encouraged to listen to the story for the beauty of the language. It’s a New Zealand story about New Zealanders told in a lively, contemporary way. It’s a big first for us. The way in which the Maori language is now used in such a colloquial way in everyday language convinces us that the time is right for a series like this.”

Whanau was produced by Maaka McGregor and Wiremu Grace for Te Mängai Päho, the organisation which funds Maori language radio and television programmes.

To assist listeners, information about the Whanau series, including script translations and access to audio links will also be added to the Radio New Zealand website www.radionz.co.nz


Whanau on National Radio

Challenging, Informing and Entertaining New Zealand


Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Gordon Campbell: Best New Music Of 2017

Any ‘best of list’ has to be an exercise in wishful thinking, given the splintering of everyone’s listening habits... But maybe… it could be time for the re-discovery of the lost art of listening to an entire album, all the way through. Just putting that idea out there. More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Ten x Ten - One Hundred of Te Papa's Best-Loved Art Works

An idiosyncratic selection by ten art curators, each of whom have chosen ten of their favourite works. Handsomely illustrated, their choices are accompanied by full-page colour prints and brief descriptions of the work, explaining in straightforward and approachable language why it is of historical, cultural, or personal significance. More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Portacom City - Reporting On Canterbury Earthquakes

In Portacom City Paul Gorman describes his own deeply personal story of working as a journalist during the quakes, while also speaking more broadly about the challenges that confront reporters at times of crisis. More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Christopher Pugsley’s The Camera in the Crowd - Filming in New Zealand Peace and War 1895-1920

Pugsley brings to life 25 exhilarating years of film making and picture screening in a sumptuously illustrated hardback published by Oratia that tells the story through surviving footage unearthed from the national film archives. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland