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Compaq Staff Raise $40,000 For Cure Kids

AUCKLAND (August 2): Compaq Computer New Zealand's sponsorship of the Compaq 50K of Coronet, a major international endurance ski race won by the German ski team this week is not just about pushing the boundaries of speed. It is also dedicated to improving the prospects of children afflicted with life threatening illnesses through the Cure Kids charity. The staff at Compaq have embraced Cure Kids and over the last five weeks raising $40,000 for the charity.

A young Cure Kids ambassador, suffering from cystic fibrosis (a disease for which there is no cure), told her moving story to employees at Compaq's Christchurch, Wellington and Auckland offices.

Her heart felt tale touched a chord encouraging Compaq staff to expand on Compaq's role as a sponsor of the race, and fundraiser for Cure Kids, a division of the Child Health Research Foundation raising money for research into childrens' life threatening diseases.

Director of Human Resources, Bridget O'Shannessey says the challenge was taken up with intense passion. Aside from raising $40,000 throughout the country, in such a short time frame, the project was a major team exercise.

"With 380 staff employed in Compaq that equates to over $100 a head. This process was a fantastic way of involving all employees, from all departments and locations. The atmosphere which was created was amazing and the morale and team work shown by everyone, at all levels, was outstanding and a credit to all our employees."

Several fundraisers were organised ranging from a Cabaret and Charity Auction to donations through the payroll, raffles, movie nights, and a ten pin bowling competition combined with an auction.

"The enthusiasm was quite incredible and the amounts raised often far exceeded expectations."

Cure Kids Marketing Director Kaye Parker says the support from Compaq staff has been overwhelming. "I think what really motivated them was hearing Rebecca Dixon tell her story. She is passionate about getting more research for the 20,000 New Zealand children who have life threatening diseases. People can't help but be affected by her drive and energy. The staff just wanted to help and what an outstanding result."

END


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